The Irony of Identity: Self and Imagination in the Drama of Christopher Marlowe

By Ian McAdam | Go to book overview

Index
Allen, Don Cameron, 34, 64–65
Althusser, Louis, 238
Airman, Joel B., 248 n. 43, 260 n. 57
Arianism, 18, 19, 30, 105
Aristotle, 119, 196–97
Assheton, John, 18
atheism, 18–20, 30, 173, 174, 256 n. 83
Aubrey, John, 30
Augustine, 14, 15, 33, 55, 110, 138, 235–39, 243
Augustinian theology, 15, 16, 24, 3233, 35, 40, 42, 118, 138, 227–28, 23539. See also Calvinism, Lutheranism
Baines, Richard, 17–18
Baines Note, 17–18, 20, 34, 40, 41, 70, 107, 117, 149, 172–73
Bakeless, John, 20, 48, 49
Barber, C. L., 74, 82, 87, 117, 140, 261 n. 72
Bartels, Emily, 22, 24, 163, 173–74
Battenhouse, Roy, 103
Baum, Frank, 57
Bawcutt, N. W., 153, 157, 165, 174
Beard, Thomas, 245
Beauvoir, Simone de, 249 n. 64
Belsey, Catherine, 15–16, 73, 75, 76
Benston, Kimberley, 93–94
Bevington, David and Eric Rasmussen, 139, 258 n. 7, 260 n. 50
Birringer, Johannes, 76, 77, 100–101, 123, 257 n. 6
Blackburn, William, 32, 112, 126, 133–34
Bluestone, Max, 114, 136
Boas, Frederick, 18, 114
Bonaventure, 239
Boswell, John, 155, 251 n. 109
Boucher, Jean, 266 n. 1
Bowers, Fredson, 260 n. 52
Bowie, Malcolm, 55
Boyette, Purvis, 199, 202, 219, 222
Bradbrook, M. C, 20
Brady, Jennifer, 200, 201
Bray, Alan, 34–35, 39–40, 126, 199, 202, 265 n. 60
Bredbeck, Gregory, 251 n. 98
Briggs, Julia, 176–77, 186, 195, 266n. 1
Briggs, William Dinsmore, 19
Brodwin, Leonora Leet, 42, 203, 204, 222
Bruno, Giordano, 20, 30, 80–82, 105, 109, 114, 250 n. 72
Bunyan, John, 149–50
Burnett, Mark Thornton, 98, 255 n. 38
cabalism, 32, 133
Calvin, John, 33, 256 n. 83
Calvinism, 16, 31, 32–33, 117, 257 n. 6, 261 n. 75
Cambridge, 17, 29, 44
Campanella, Tommaso, 21
Campbell, Lily B., 117
Camus, Albert, 102, 228
Canterbury, 17, 261 n. 80
Catholic, Catholicism, 29, 35–36, 81, 117, 132, 177, 197, 228–29
Cecil, Robert, 82
Cheung, King-Kok, 257 n. 6
Chew, Samuel C, 106
Christ: in Augustinian theology, 33; in Baines Note, 40; divinity of, 18, 19, 20, 30, 250 n. 72; in Donne's "Good Friday," 13; maleness of, 35, 70, 132, 250n. 90; as Mediator, 105, 117, 120, 144–45, 256 n. 83; parody of, 47, 83, 105, 106, 157, 168, 174, 194; radical individualism of, 148, 150; type of, 148, 218; usurping aspect of, 151, 160–61
Christianity: criticism of, 17, 155, 168, 174; its denigration of others, 23, 152; fate of soul in, 109; iconography of, 144–45; and homosexuality, 40,

-279-

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The Irony of Identity: Self and Imagination in the Drama of Christopher Marlowe
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The Irony of Identity - Self and Imagination in the Drama of Christopher Marlowe 3
  • Contents 7
  • Acknowledgments 9
  • The Irony of Identity 11
  • 1: Introduction 13
  • 2: Dido Queen of Carthage: Tenuous Manhood 44
  • 3: Tamburlaine the Great: Tenuous Godhood 73
  • 4: Doctor Faustus: the Exorcism of God 112
  • 5: The Jew of Malta: the Failure of Carnal Identity 146
  • 6: The Massacre at Paris: the Exorcism of Machevil 175
  • 7: Edward Ii: the Illusion of Integrity 198
  • 8: Conclusion 232
  • Notes 247
  • Bibliography 271
  • Index 279
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