Medicine and Medical Ethics in Nazi Germany: Origins, Practices, Legacies

By Francis R. Nicosia; Jonathan Huener | Go to book overview

Chapter Six
THE LEGACY OF NAZI MEDICINE
IN CONTEXT

Michael Burleigh

THERE IS NO IDEAL CONCLUSION in a collection such as this, but there are plenty of dilemmas associated with writing one. Should one merely summarize what has been so cogently expressed before by many of the leading scholars in their respective subdisciplines? But that is surely the proper function of an introduction, and Professors Nicosia and Huener have provided a splendid introduction already. Or should one expand on themes that have been alluded to in passing, or for which no room was found at the time of the book’s conception, but which may well seem necessary at its completion? Which elements of the complex of themes often all too facilely described under the rubric “Nazi medicine” is one supposed to emphasize?

As Robert Proctor suggests, there is the serious risk of missing the simultaneity of heinous criminality, whether murdering sick people or carrying out vile “medical” experiments on the living, with research that may have been pioneering in such fields as oncology. One suspects that the leading British cancer expert, Sir Richard Doll of the University of Oxford, can live with the shocking news that an otherwise obscure German scientist, Fritz Lickint, may have reached some of his conclusions about the relation between cigarette smoking and certain cancers a couple of decades earlier. Neither Lickint nor Franz Müller was the first to make such a connection, for in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, some doctors in Britain, France, and Germany had linked pipe smoking with certain cancers of the lips, mouth, and nose. Sir Richard studied in Frankfurt for a fortnight in the 1930s. He was

-112-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Medicine and Medical Ethics in Nazi Germany: Origins, Practices, Legacies
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 160

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.