Sports Heroes, Fallen Idols

By Stanley H. Teitelbaum | Go to book overview

Acknowledgments

The impetus for this book came from my lifelong love of both sports and psychology.

I wish to thank Basil Kane for his encouragement and direction of this work and Sara Springsteen of the University of Nebraska Press for her enthusiasm about the project. Rob Taylor, Chris Steinke, and Sandra Johnson provided valuable input along the way, and Alice Bennett supplied a central focus to the book.

The following family members were especially helpful in keeping me on track: Leighsa King for her sustained interest in the material and for connecting me with key resources; Lawrence Teitelbaum for his shared interest in the world of sports and maintaining a perpetual hot stove league dialogue; John King and Diane Teitelbaum for their ongoing support; and Jake Ross Teitelbaum for being an inspirational hero himself.

I owe appreciation to Ned Babbitt and Phil Harmon for their valuable critiques of sections of the book and to Peter Buirski, Alan Melowsky, Laura Stein, Al Pollock, and Joe Feldman for their useful suggestions. George Kaplan and Bob Grossman are long-standing cheerleaders who stirred me forward.

I am grateful to Sue Macy, who acquainted me with the importance of female sports icons and their travails, and to Harry Carson, who provided his keen insights into the psyche of professional athletes.

The entire staff at the Teaneck, New Jersey, public library and Victor Estrellado at the Hackensack, New Jersey, library were assiduous in locating resource material. Yoni Shenkman and Josh Lukin were relentless in researching obscure information that was indispensable for the flow of this book.

-ix-

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Sports Heroes, Fallen Idols
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Sports Heroes, Fallen Idols iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1. the Need for Heroes 1
  • 2. the Psyche of the Athlete 17
  • 3. Baseball Gambling Scandals 33
  • 4. Football Gambling Scandals 58
  • 5. Basketball Gambling Scandals 69
  • 6. Self-Destructive Athletes 101
  • 7. Athletes and Violence toward Women 138
  • 8. Athletes and Murder 178
  • 9. Violence between Athletes 197
  • 10. Athletes’ Mental Health Problems 220
  • Epilogue 240
  • Notes 249
  • Index 265
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