Sports Heroes, Fallen Idols

By Stanley H. Teitelbaum | Go to book overview

Epilogue

The prevalence of athletes who are caught up in gambling, drugs or alcohol, violence toward women, murder, violence between players, and mental illness—the primary themes of this book—has been growing rapidly. The cavalcade of new incidents seems endless. Here are a few episodes that have recently made headlines.

January 2003: Dwayne Goodrich, Dallas Cowboys defensive back,
was convicted of manslaughter for the hit-and-run deaths of two men
who had stopped to help someone in a burning car. Goodrich was
sentenced to seven and a half years in prison.

March 2003: Adrian McPherson, a former Florida State University
quarterback, was charged with gambling on games he played in. His
trial ended in a hung jury and was expected to go to retrial. McPher-
son was also awaiting trial on charges of grand theft for allegedly re-
ceiving $3,500 from a stolen check.He was suspended from the foot-
ball team. Subsequently he was given thirty months of probation plus
community service and required to repay $4,000 in a multifaceted
plea bargain.

March 2003: Jim Harrick, the men’s basketball coach at the Univer-
sity of Georgia, was suspended in connection with allegations of aca-
demic fraud and unethical conduct when it was revealed that three
players had been given fraudulent grades in a class taught by his
son. Harrick had previously been dismissed for falsifying expense
accounts after winning the national title at UCLA in 1995.

April 2003: Zack Randolph, a Portland Trail Blazer reserve forward,

-240-

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Sports Heroes, Fallen Idols
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Sports Heroes, Fallen Idols iii
  • Contents vii
  • Acknowledgments ix
  • Introduction xi
  • 1. the Need for Heroes 1
  • 2. the Psyche of the Athlete 17
  • 3. Baseball Gambling Scandals 33
  • 4. Football Gambling Scandals 58
  • 5. Basketball Gambling Scandals 69
  • 6. Self-Destructive Athletes 101
  • 7. Athletes and Violence toward Women 138
  • 8. Athletes and Murder 178
  • 9. Violence between Athletes 197
  • 10. Athletes’ Mental Health Problems 220
  • Epilogue 240
  • Notes 249
  • Index 265
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