CALIFORNIA AND
ITS SPANISH GOVERNORS
CHAPTER 6

Gaspar de Portolá was followed by several interim governors. The best of these was the aforementioned Felipe de Neve. Like Portolá, Neve was both a military commander and a governor. Though a soldier, he had the mind of a statesman. He soon drew up regulations to guide local civic and military affairs. As noted, Neve also founded California’s new pueblos.

As these remote settlements badly needed colonists, in 1781 Captain Rivera y Moncada received orders to conduct what turned out to be a motley party of would-be settlers bound for Los Angeles and San José. Tragedy, however, struck this group. At the Colorado River, having moved northward from Sonora and Sinaloa, Rivera sent the colonists ahead, while he and his soldiers, accompanied by the trails-priest Father Garcés, stopped to rest. On July 17, 1781, the Yuma Indians attacked two missions—Purisma Concepcion and San Pedro y San Pablo—that had been established as way stations near the river crossing. All the friars in the mission, the male settlers in the area, and the men in Rivera’s command, including himself and Father Garcés, were shot or clubbed to death. The women and children, while spared execution, were herded off into slavery. Apparently, the Spanish had previously promised the Yumas supplies and good treatment by soldiers and settlers alike.

Resenting the Spanish interlopers, the Yumas watched the clumsy expedition march right through their cornfields and pumpkin patches. What became known as the Yuma Massacre led to the abandonment of this dangerous route to California. It had originally been opened by Anza; neither pueblos nor missions were reestablished along the Colorado River. As a result, the province of Alta California continued in its isolation from the rest of New Spain.

-49-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
California: A History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 452

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.