SOCIAL FERMENT
CHAPTER 16

Although California had finally entered the American Union, it now faced serious social problems. The sheer number of persons who arrived during and after the gold rush created a formidable assimilative challenge. Society, therefore, remained in turmoil. Numerous discordant and lawless persons had come into the new state. Assimilation of such a disparate population would pose a formidable challenge.

By 1850, only 8 percent of the population of 100,000 had been born in California. Nearly a fourth had come from foreign countries. Black persons numbered fewer than 1,000. Bands of Indians, bewildered by the American conquest, wandered about in confusion. State population grew to more than 300,000 by 1860. Among whites, men outnumbered women by a ratio of twelve to one.

At San Francisco, because law enforcement was weak, a number of “respectable citizens” took it upon themselves to stamp out crime. As municipal corruption had also become entrenched, they enforced their own morality. Soon mob justice was actually condoned due to frustration over the failings of law and order. Local vigilantes and amateur legal authorities devised their own punishments against lawbreaking drifters who had filtered back into the city from abandoned mining camps. White vigilance committees in the camps set thmselves up as “popular tribunals,” acting as “champions of justice and of right.” Such mobs could easily become a rabble animated by passion.

After the discovery of gold, hundreds of potential criminals paralyzed the infant municipal organization of San Francisco. In 1849 a band of toughs, who called themselves the “Hounds” or the “Regulators,” terrorized the city. The members of a similar group of hoodlums, known as the “Sydney Ducks,” had arrived from Great Britain’s prison colony in Australia. They greatly confused

-130-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
California: A History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 452

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.