Chapter 38
SEEKING NEW SOLUTIONS

Toward the end of the 1960s, political conservatism in California remained strong. The gubernatorial election of 1966–67 played itself out in an atmosphere of alarm over an increased crime rate, high property taxes, and civil disturbances. Riots by black youths in the Watts area of Los Angeles and student protests at the state university in Berkeley, deeply disturbed most voters. Racial tensions also lurked in the background as Governor Edmund “Pat” Brown sought a third term against a new challenger, the popular film actor Ronald Reagan.

During the campaign, Reagan, formerly the president of Hollywood’s Screen Actors Guild, stressed his political inexperience. Yet he made effective use of campaign funds provided by conservative business backers. A veteran of more than fifty motion pictures, Reagan projected a relaxed selfpossession before television cameras. In 1967, by convincing the electorate that he was a moderate grown weary of massive social welfare programs, Reagan defeated Governor Pat Brown by nearly a million votes.

Reagan’s campaign promises included tax relief, which voters had come to expect. In order not to raise taxes, the governor hoped to make government more frugal. He proposed slashing the state budget by 10 percent, which immediately raised a storm of protest. In 1968, Reagan actually faced a movement to recall him. He had barely assumed the governorship when his proposed university budget cuts placed him at odds with the state’s professoriate. Yet Reagan’s so-called “anti-intellectualism” was partly applauded by the public. He also hoped to impose higher tuition fees upon California’s public universities and, as noted, sought to control radicals on their campuses.

When Reagan next proposed to trim public assistance agencies and to close some mental health clinics, he faced another uproar. Whenever

-359-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
California: A History
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 452

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.