Home Front U.S.A: America during World War II

By Allan M. Winkler | Go to book overview

EPILOGUE

Without question, World War II left the United States different than it had been before. Yet the crucial question remains: Just how different had the nation become? Historians throughout the postwar decades have argued about the intensity of the war’s impact, even as they have debated the degree to which it was a watershed in the country’s course. The debate began in the first treatments of home-front issues written shortly after the war and has continued unabated in subsequent years, revolving around the relative importance of the many changes sparked by the war. While definitive answers remain elusive, the discussion itself provides a starting point in an attempt to understand the ultimate effect of the struggle.

Some historians have stressed the marked change experienced by wartime America. Richard Polenberg, in War and Society, Geoffrey Perrett in Days of Sadness, Years of Triumph, and James MacGregor Burns, in Roosevelt: The Soldier of Freedom, are among those who have underscored the profound and powerful impact of the cataclysmic conflict. While the nation suffered no physical destruction within continental borders, this analysis posits that the American people’s all-encompassing involvement in the greatest struggle ever known brought economic, social, and political change to an unprecedented degree.

The war ushered in the Keynesian revolution as it brought a return of prosperity after the dismal Great Depression. The mas-

-106-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Home Front U.S.A: America during World War II
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • The American History Series i
  • Home Front U.S.A. America during World War II iii
  • Foreward vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Contents xi
  • Prologue 1
  • Chapter One - The Arsenal of Democracy 5
  • Chapter Two - American Society at War 28
  • Chapter Three - Outsiders and Ethnic Groups 54
  • Chapter Four - The Politics of War 86
  • Epilogue 106
  • Bibliographical Essay 111
  • Index 125
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 140

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.