Rogue Regime: Kim Jong Il and the Looming Threat of North Korea

By Jasper Becker | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 12
Grappling with a Rogue State

U.S. Secretary of State Madeleine Albright was in Pyongyang in the last months of the second Clinton Administration holding talks with Kim Jong Il when he announced he had prepared a special surprise for her. That evening they arrived at the May Day Stadium for a performance by 100,000 citizens, which Kim confided would help the Americans understand North Korea. A huge crowd gave forth a volcano of rapturous sounds as they arrived. “It began with a giant image of a hammer for workers, a brush for intellectuals, and a sickle for farmers. Then suddenly, everywhere, there were children, dancing gymnasts cartwheeling, sequined costumes swirling and people flying about on little rockets. There were youngsters dressed up as flowers, soldiers thrusting their bayonets, fireworks and people shot from canons into a net. There was a human card section rapidly and precisely flashing tens of thousands of placards showing detailed murals and illustrated slogans accompanied by thunderous patriotic chants,” Albright recalled in her memoirs Madam Secretary. In the midst of all this the card section showed a Taepodong missile being launched into the sky and before the applause faded, Kim turned to her and said, “That was our first missile launch—and our last.”

One of the central mysteries of North Korea is what Kim Jong Il has really been trying to achieve in the ten years since his father’s death. No coherent long-term domestic or foreign policies have emerged, and in the

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Rogue Regime: Kim Jong Il and the Looming Threat of North Korea
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Rogue Regime - Kim Jong IL and the Looming Threat of North Korea iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface: Rogue State ix
  • Rogue Regime xv
  • Introduction 1
  • Chapter 1 - Famine and Flight 20
  • Chapter 2 - The Kim Dynasty 40
  • Chapter 3 - The Making of a God King 64
  • Chapter 4 - Slave State 85
  • Chapter 5 - North Korea’s Economic Collapse 101
  • Chapter 6 - Kim Jong Il’s Court 124
  • Chapter 7 - Kim Jong Il—the Terrorist Master 146
  • Chapter 8 - Nuclear Warlord 165
  • Chapter 9 - Kim Jong Il—the Reformer 190
  • Chapter 10 - The United Nations and Genocide 209
  • Chapter 11 - Kim Dae Jung and the South Korean Way 228
  • Chapter 12 - Grappling with a Rogue State 249
  • Afterword 266
  • Notes 275
  • Bibliography 287
  • Acknowledgments 293
  • Index 295
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