Charles Darwin and the Evolution Revolution

By Rebecca Stefoff | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 1
Starting Points

On September 15, 1835, a small ship called the Beagle sailed toward a cluster of islands that lie scattered across the equator in the Pacific Ocean, some 600 miles off the west coast of South America. Aboard the Beagle a young scientist named Charles Darwin eagerly awaited a glimpse of land. The first island he saw, however, was a disappointment. “Nothing could be less inviting than the first appearance,” he wrote in his journal. The landscape was a broken field of black lava, rising in rugged peaks that were gouged by deep, gaping crevasses. A few stunted, leafless bushes were the only signs of life. Robert FitzRoy, the Beagle’s captain, compared the hot, desolate island to hell, and Darwin wrote, “The dry and parched surface, being heated by the noonday sun, gave to the air a close and sultry feeling, like that from a stove: we fancied even that the bushes smelt unpleasantly.” This was Darwin’s introduction to the Galápagos Islands. Dismal and lifeless as they seemed at first, these islands were to play a vital role in Darwin’s work— work that would revolutionize humankind’s understanding of life on this planet.

The British government had sent the Beagle and its crew on a round-the-world expedition aimed at improv-

-9-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Charles Darwin and the Evolution Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Charles Darwin - And the Evolution Revolution 3
  • Contents 5
  • Chapter 1 - Starting Points 9
  • Chapter 2 - The Restless Searcher 25
  • Chapter 3 - The Voyage of the Beagle 40
  • Chapter 4 - The Birth of a Theory 58
  • Chapter 5 - A‘‘devil’s Chaplain’’ 76
  • Chapter 6 - Darwin’s Legacy 105
  • Chronology 117
  • Glossary 119
  • Further Reading 121
  • Index 125
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 128

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.