Charles Darwin and the Evolution Revolution

By Rebecca Stefoff | Go to book overview

CHAPTER 3
The Voyage of
the Beagle

The letter that Darwin received on that fateful day was from John Stevens Henslow. It contained a remarkable offer: a chance for Darwin to sail around the world. The British navy ship Beagle was being sent to South America to make coastal surveys. From there the ship would return to England by way of the Pacific and Indian oceans. The Beagle’s captain, 26-year-old Robert FitzRoy, wanted someone to keep him company during the three-year voyage, which would offer outstanding opportunities for natural history study in many parts of the globe. Henslow had recommended Darwin. Was Darwin interested?

Indeed he was. At Cambridge Darwin had read the works of Alexander von Humboldt (1769–1859), a German naturalist who was hailed as one of the world’s foremost scientific travelers. Darwin’s imagination was fired by Humboldt’s descriptions of South American rain forests and volcanoes; he longed to see some of these faraway wonders for himself. He was wildly excited when he read Henslow’s letter. But his diary for the next day contains only the words “Refused offer of Voyage.” Behind that curt sentence lay a world of frustration.

-40-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Charles Darwin and the Evolution Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Charles Darwin - And the Evolution Revolution 3
  • Contents 5
  • Chapter 1 - Starting Points 9
  • Chapter 2 - The Restless Searcher 25
  • Chapter 3 - The Voyage of the Beagle 40
  • Chapter 4 - The Birth of a Theory 58
  • Chapter 5 - A‘‘devil’s Chaplain’’ 76
  • Chapter 6 - Darwin’s Legacy 105
  • Chronology 117
  • Glossary 119
  • Further Reading 121
  • Index 125
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 128

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.