British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

the want of a station such as Rhio would be hourly felt in the exercise of our commerce; and there is no substitute for it the moment we, by giving the spice trade exclusively to the Dutch, depart from an unlimited communication directly with the Malays in their respective islands. . . .


12
HENRY DUNDAS TO LORD GRENVILLE 23 April 17931

... The preservation of the Cape of Good Hope is an object of so much importance, both to Holland and Great Britain, it is impossible for this country to view with indifference any circumstance that can endanger the safety of that Settlement, and therefore, before making any particular answer to the requisition of the Dutch East India Company on that subject, I would wish your Lordship to inform me, by means of Lord Auckland, what is the force now at the Cape, either naval or military, what is conceived to be sufficient for rendering the possession of it perfectly secure, how far there is reason to confide in a full supply of provisions and other stores upon the island, either for troops or ships of war, and how far the Dutch are disposed to allow a depôt of British troops to be placed at the Cape, either for its own defence, or for acting offensively from it, if in the course of the war any such measure should be thought expedient. . . .


13
SIR FRANCIS BARING TO HENRY DUNDAS 4 January 17952

Devonshire Square.

DEAR SIR,

The present situation of Holland rendering it doubtful whether she may be able to retain her neutrality, or be obliged to submit to conditions which cannot be foreseen, nor their consequences easily calculated, I beg leave to suggest for your consideration how far it may be right to prepare for an attempt on the Cape of Good Hope which I conceive may easily be surprised, but difficult to conquer if the French shall be suffered to throw a garrison into it. The importance of the Cape is in my opinion comprised under two heads--as a place of refreshment for our ships on their return from India, as St. Helena is unequal to the supply, and we should be much distressed for a substitute if the Cape is lost to us. Secondly, whoever is master of the

____________________
1
Records of Cape Colony, ed. G. M. Theal, vol. i, Lond. 1897, p. 10.
2
R.C.C., vol. i, p. 17 and pp. 22-23. Sir Francis Baring, 'the first merchant in Europe', was a Director and had been Chairman of the East India Company.

-17-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 622

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.