Learning and Memory: The Brain in Action

By Marilee Sprenger | Go to book overview

4
Strolling Down Memory Lanes:
Memory and Storage Systems

My two children will be arriving from their respective universities to-
night for the Thanksgiving holiday. I have had an unusually long day at
school, and I still havea5o’clock meeting to attend. I am rushing to the
grocery store to stock my kitchen with the foods my children like.

My time is limited, and I am scurrying through the grocery store
tossing items into my basket. I am very familiar with the layout of the
store because I shop here often. As I reach the last aisle in the store, I
realize that I have missed several items along my route. I ask myself,
“Where is the pancake mix?” (Daughter Marnie loves pancakes.) I be-
gin my search as I glance at my watch and conclude that I have only
minutes to complete my shopping and get to my meeting on time.
Okay, the mix must be in the aisle with the baking items. No luck. Well,
then, it must be with the breakfast cereal. No, not there. Now I am not
only perplexed, but also feeling some stress because of my time con-
straints. Where is the darn pancake mix?

Memories can be affected by the time constraints that we place on ourselves.

Of course, I could ask someone. I look around. There is no help to
be found. Okay, I guess I’ll just go down all these aisles. I look at my
watch again. If I am not out of here in 10 minutes, I’ll be late for the
meeting. My cart and I accelerate. My heart is racing as I think about
Marnie’s disappointment if I do not find the mix, and the disapproving
looks from my committee members if I walk in late. “Why in the world
did I agree to this meeting on this of all nights?!” As I zoom down the
aisles, the food passes by in a blur. Am I really able to see what is here?

Trying to do too many things at once may cause the brain to refuse to cooperate.

The 4:30 time on my watch causes an alarm to go off in my head.
That’s it! I have no more time. Sorry, Marnie. Maybe bacon and eggs
will have to do! I dash to the checkout lane and unload my cart as my
heart still beats wildly.

Locating memories may be impossible if we aren’t looking in the right place.

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Learning and Memory: The Brain in Action
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 124

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.