British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

who shall become his enemies, or commit capital offences against the State, shall not be protected by the English.


ARTICLE VI

If any enemy come to attack us by land, and we require assistance from the honourable Company, of men, arms or ammunition, the honourable Company will supply us at our expense.

This Article will be referred for the orders of the English East India Company, together with such parts of the King of Quedah's requests as cannot be complied with previous to their consent being obtained.


33
CAPTAIN FRANCIS LIGHT TO THE GOVERNOR- GENERAL, BENGAL, 25 January 17941

[Fort Cornwallis.]

HONOURABLE SIR,

From the present populousness of the Settlement and the daily increase of its inhabitants, circumstances repeatedly occur tending to show the necessity of establishing a more regular form of Government than exists at present under the sole administration of one person. From the great number of strangers constantly coming and going, a strict police is essentially requisite. From the great diversity of inhabitants, differing in religion, laws, language and customs, a constant and patient attention to their various complaints must be afforded, and from the increasing acquisitions of new settlers, to portion them out lands, to fix their boundaries, and encourage their industry, by administering to their more urgent necessities, which of itself is a sufficient employment for one person, a part of the Superintendent's time must be occupied.

In the letter from your honourable Board bearing date the 24th January 1787, in case of the removal of the Superintendent by death or otherwise it is directed that he be succeeded by the Commanding Officer of the Troops. This for a temporary relief may suffice but as the power by this event, both civil, military, or judicial, will be vested in the hands of one person, without any intermediate authority on the spot, either to control or to advise, it appears to me that if continued, especially in a commercial settlement like this, many cases would occur novel to a military officer, and disagreeable circumstances might soon arise which would evince the absolute necessity of separating

____________________
1
Journal of the Indian Archipelago, vol. v, Singapore 185I, pp. 7-11. Sir John Shore (afterwards Lord Teignmouth), an honest but somewhat timid bureaucrat, was Governor-General. He did not consider himself empowered to introduce such courts, though on 1 August the Supreme Council agreed to appoint two Assistants to help the Superintendent.

-56-

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