British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview
condition of complete pecuniary independence, than in His surrender of the remaining revenues of the colony, to the free and uncontrolled discussion of the Combined Court.His Majesty will learn with the liveliest satisfaction, that the liberal proposals which I have thus authorized you to make, have been met, as I will venture to anticipate that they will be, by a corresponding spirit on the part of the Court of Policy and the financial representatives; and that an end may thus be put at once and satisfactorily to those embarrassments which have so long perplexed the Government and retarded the prosperity of the colony. . . .
19 9 February 18251
CAPE COLONY: ADDITIONAL INSTRUCTIONS TO GOVERNOR LORD CHARLES SOMERSET
. . . And whereas We have thought fit that a Council should be constituted and appointed within Our said settlement to advise and assist in the administration of the government thereof, now therefore We do hereby declare it to be Our will and pleasure that there shall be henceforward a Council within Our said settlement to consist of the following persons whom We do hereby constitute and appoint to be members of Our said Council during Our will and pleasure, any two of whom (together with yourself or, in your absence, together with the member presiding) to be a quorum viz:--
The Chief Justice;
The Colonial Secretary;
The Officer next in command for the time being to the Commander of the forces;
Lieutenant Colonel Bell;2
Walter Bentinck Esqr, Auditor General;
J. W. Stoll Esqr, Receiver General.

You shall as soon as conveniently may be call together the persons whom We have hereby nominated and appointed as aforesaid to be members of Our said Council and shall administer to them respectively. . . the usual oaths for the due execution of their places and trust respectively, all which oaths shall also be administered by the Governor or person administering the Government of Our said settlement for the time being to all such persons as shall hereafter be

____________________
1
C.O. 49/16: printed in R.C.C., vol. xx ( 1904), pp. 7-II. Lieut.-General Lord Charles Somerset was Governor and Commander-in-Chief of the Cape from 1813 to 1827.
2
A veteran of the Peninsular War who succeeded Sir Richard Plasket as Colonial Secretary in 1827.

-111-

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