British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

Our pleasure that in every case it shall be competent to any member of Our said Council to record at length on the minutes of the said Council the grounds and reason of any advice or opinion he may give upon any question brought under the consideration of such Council, and it being also Our pleasure that in the event of your acting upon any occasion in opposition to the advice of the whole or the major part of the said Council, you do by the first opportunity transmit to Us through one of Our Principal Secretaries of State a full explanation of the grounds of every such measure, together with complete copies of the minutes, if any, of the said Council relating thereto. And We do further direct that twice in each year a full transcript of all the minutes of Council of the preceding half year be transmitted to Us through one of Our Principal Secretaries of State.


20
PETITION OF CITIZENS OF CAPE TOWN TO LIEUT.- GOVERNOR RICHARD BOURKE, 15 July 18261

May it please your Honour in Council, we the undersigned citizens and freeholders of Cape Town, having been informed that by resignation of the President and some members of the Burgher Senate all the seats except one have become vacant in said Burgher Senate, and considering that a public election of the members of the Burgher Senate from amongst and by the freeholders and citizens of this town would tend to constitute mutual confidence between the Burgher Senate and the citizens, that it would, far more than any other means as yet resorted to, cooperate to amalgamate His Majesty's natural born subjects and the Cape inhabitants when both meeting as brothers of one community, and electing from amongst both, will have the same common interest and one common object in view, viz. the welfare of both.

And also considering that in all other colonies under the dominion of Great Britain the inhabitants and citizens are duly represented by a body of men elected by the public, without any such body existing in this colony.

We therefore humbly beg that it may please your Honour in Council to grant us and other freeholders, citizens of this town, the privilege to appear on a certain requisition at the Town House, and there publicly to elect by majority of votes such person or persons,

____________________
1
C.O. 48/82: printed in R.C.C., vol. xxvii ( 1905), p. 208. This petition was signed by 194 Dutch and 48 English inhabitants. Richard Bourke, who had served with Wellington in the Peninsular War, was appointed to the Cape as Lieut.- Governor of the Eastern District in 1825. He acted as Governor in Somerset's absence on leave in 1826, and, after Somerset's resignation, until Sir Lowry Cole's appointment in 1828. In 1831 he was appointed Governor of New South Wales.

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