British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

out and avowing fairly that the object is to retain the dependence of the province by establishing in it a constitution less free than that which existed in the ancient colonies, or than that which has been established in those provinces which still remain to Great Britain. And, considering the general temper of the present moment, it may well be doubted whether it would be possible to maintain with success (supposing, even, that it were desirable to do so) either that these means are well calculated for attaining the object in question, or that the object itself ought to be aimed at, by denying to so large a body of British subjects the benefits of the British constitution; particularly in those points which are considered so essential as those which are here in question.


13
CANADA: THE CONSTITUTIONAL ACT 31Geo. III, cap. xxx11

An Act to repeal certain parts of an Act, passed in the fourteenth year of His Majesty's reign, intituled, 'An Act for making more effectual provision for the government of the province of Quebec, in North America'; and to make further provision for the government of the said province.

. . . II. And whereas His Majesty has been pleased to signify, by His message to both Houses of Parliament, His royal intention to divide His province of Quebec into two separate provinces, to be called the province of Upper Canada, and the province of Lower Canada; be it enacted by the authority aforesaid, that there shall be within each of the said provinces respectively a Legislative Council, and an Assembly, to be severally composed and constituted in the manner hereinafter described; and that in each of the said provinces respectively His Majesty, His heirs or successors, shall have power, during the continuance of this Act, by and with the advice and consent of the Legislative Council and Assembly of such provinces respectively, to make laws for the peace, welfare, and good government thereof, such laws not being repugnant to this Act;and that all such laws, being passed by the Legislative Council and Assembly of either of the said provinces respectively, and assented to by His Majesty, His heirs or successors, or assented to in His Majesty's name, by such person as His Majesty, His heirs or successors, shall from time to time appoint to be the Governor, or Lieutenant Governor, of such province, or by such person as His Majesty, His heirs or successors, shall from time to time appoint to administer the Government within the same, shall be, and the same are hereby declared to

____________________
1
Printed in Shortt and Doughty, vol. ii, pp. 1031-50.

-210-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 622

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.