British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

nevertheless to the condition hereinbefore recited, with respect to the application of any duties which may be imposed for that purpose: be it therefore enacted by the authority aforesaid, that nothing in this Act contained shall extend, or be construed to extend, to prevent or affect the execution of any law which hath been or shall at any time be made by His Majesty, His heirs or successors, and the Parliament of Great Britain, for establishing regulations or prohibitions, or for imposing, levying, or collecting duties for the regulation of naviga- tion, or for the regulation of the commerce to be carried on between the said two provinces, or between either of the said provinces and any other part of His Majesty's dominions, or between either of the said provinces and any foreign country or state, or for appointing and directing the payment of drawbacks of such duties so imposed, or to give to His Majesty, His heirs or successors, any power or authority, by and with the advice and consent of such Legislative Councils and Assemblies respectively, to vary or repeal any such law or laws, or any part thereof, or in any manner to prevent or obstruct the execution thereof.

XLVII. Provided always, and be it enacted by the authority afore- said, that the net produce of all duties which shall be so imposed shall at all times hereafter be applied to and for the use of each of the said provinces respectively, and in such manner only as shall be directed by any law or laws which may be made by His Majesty, His heirs or successors, by and with the advice and consent of the Legis- lative Council and Assembly of such province.


14
CANADA: LORD DORCHESTER TO THE DUKE OF PORTLAND, 2o February 17951

Quebec.

[He complains that the growing practice of direct communication between London and the Lieutenant-Governors of the Provinces tends to weaken his own general powers of superintendence as Governor-in-Chief over both civil and military matters.]

. . . A different system has been since adopted, tending to revive the old colonial practice, which from an early period prepared, and gradually rendered all things favourable for leaders of rebellion, to usurp from Government the confidence and gratitude of the people; and ended in revolt and dismemberment of the Empire.

____________________
1
C.O. 42/101, pp. 515-18. Printed in A G. Doughty and D. A. McArthur, Constitutional Documents . . . 1791-1818 , Ottawa 1914, pp. 183-4. Sir Guy Carleton, who had been Lieut.-Governor of Quebec ( 1766-78) and an architect of the Quebec Act ( 1774), became Baron Dorchester on being appointed a second time to take charge of the Quebec Government ( 1786). After it had been decided to replace the Quebec Act by some form of representative government, British Ministers applied to him in vain for constructive suggestions.

-216-

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