British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

26 LORD BATHURST: MEMORANDUM ON J. Q. ADAMS'S PROPOSAL, 6 October 18161

Our colonial system will I believe be found to be generally speaking the same with regard to all foreign States.

By the Free Port Act (45 Geo. 3 cp. [57]) a relaxation of these Laws was made in favour of some British ports in the West Indies, with several limitations and restrictions, and confined to vessels owned and navigated by the subjects of European States, having possessions on the continent of America. The late Lord Liverpool, who brought in the Act, deliberately worded it so as to exclude American vessels from the benefit of the provisions.

On the other hand by the 28 Geo. 3 cp. [6], and by other Acts, the trade of our West India colonies with the United States is placed in several instances on a better footing than it is with European States; the United States therefore have no right to complain, if enjoying commercial advantages peculiar to themselves, they do not participate in those which the vessels of some European States have been for some time past permitted to possess.

The Free Port Act passed while the Commercial Treaty with the United States was in force and was not considered as a violation of it.

Whether we could extend the provisions of the Free Port Act (brought in for the encouragement of our clandestine trade with South America) to the vessels of the United States is a different question. I am inclined to think we might do so, even with advantage to our clandestine trade; but it remains to be considered, whether it might not be prejudicial to our colonial system in other respects. At any rate, it should not be granted without an equivalent. Any further relaxation of our colonial system cannot at the present moment be undertaken.

There is no objection to leave for discussion the commercial intercourse between the United States and our North American Provinces--not however admitting that the United States have any right to complain of the high duties which the Provincial Legislatures may have imposed on the import and export trade with the United States, so long as there are not lower duties on corresponding articles imported from and exported to other foreign States. The fact is, almost every direct commercial intercourse between these Provinces and the United States is a modification of our colonial system; it may not be placed on a favourable footing in Upper Canada, but the regulation under which it is allowed in the Lower Province, must shew that the intercourse is not regulated on a principle of ill will towards the United States. . . .

____________________
1
B.T. 1/110. Lord Bathurst had been asked to prepare a précis of the state of the law between the West India colonies and foreign states.

-288-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 622

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.