British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

States to her islands no higher duties than on the same articles when brought from any other foreign country, would obviously be one of but nominal reciprocity; since, after her own dominions on the continent of America, there was no other place whence such exportations to her islands would ever be made. Thus it was that this third provision, combined with the two others, became necessary to enable the United States, whilst prosecuting a trade with the British West Indies, to place their navigation upon a footing, not of verbal merely, but of real equality. It was the latter alone that could lay the foundations of a compact between the two nations that could ever be satisfactory or lasting. . . .


29
THE DUKE OF RICHMOND TO LORD BATHURST 3June 18191

Quebec.

... Herewith I have the honour to enclose to your Lordship the draft of a Bill for the better regulation of the trade between these Provinces and the United States by the St. Lawrence alluded to in my despatch marked private of the 16th May last, but which I was unable to transmit to your Lordship with that despatch, the Chief Justice under whom this Bill has been drawn up, wishing to have a little more time to consider further of some of its enactments. The objects of the Bill are first to regulate the trade between the Provinces of Upper and Lower Canada, an object of the first importance to the future tranquillity of both; and between those Provinces and the United States of America, by a permanent Act, and in a way which may equally promote the interests of the Mother Country and of the Canadas; and secondly to provide a fixed revenue which will enable the Crown in Lower Canada to support the Civil List of the Province without the necessity of an annual application to the Provincial Legislature for that purpose.

The principles of the commercial intercourse to be carried on between Upper and Lower Canada expressed in the Bill are those which by Commissioners mutually appointed by the two Provinces have been long settled. These principles have . . . always however been declared to be Law by temporary Acts; and in the last Session of the Provincial Legislature of Lower Canada a Bill for the appointment of Commissioners to regulate this intercourse as before was introduced, but was lost. The Provinces have thus been left without any rule in this respect, and the necessity of interference on the part

____________________
1
B.T. 1/139. Extract enclosed in Goulburn to Lack 14 August 1819 (see below, p.294). Charles Lennox, fourth Duke of Richmond, was appointed Governor-in- Chief of Canada in 1818. He died in August 1819.

-293-

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