British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

ships belonging to countries in amity with His Majesty should be prevented from entering into the said ports and importing and exporting thereto.


36
CAPE COLONY: ORDER IN COUNCIL 11 June 18061

At the Court at the Queen's Palace . . .

. . . And whereas during the time the said Settlement, with the Territories and Dependencies thereof, were in the possession, and under the Government of the States General of the United Provinces, or of the Honourable the General East India Company in the Netherlands, it was usual to admit the ships and vessels belonging to the subjects of countries in amity with the said United Provinces into the ports of the said Settlement, and of the Territories and Dependencies thereof, for repair and refreshment; and with that view, to permit the said ships and vessels to carry on trade with the inhabitants of the said Settlement and of the Territories and Dependencies thereof; His Majesty is hereby pleased to order, by and with the advice of His Privy Council, in pursuance of the powers vested in His Majesty by the above recited Act,2 and it is hereby ordered, that it shall be lawful until further order, for all ships and vessels belonging to His Majesty's subjects as well as for all ships and vessels belonging to the subjects of any country or state in amity with His Majesty, to enter the ports of the said Settlement of the Cape of Good Hope, and of the Territories and Dependencies thereof, and to carry on trade and traffic with the inhabitants of the said Settlement and of the Territories and Dependencies thereof, and to import and export to and from the ports of the said Settlement and of the Territories and Dependencies thereof, any goods, wares, or merchandize whatsoever, subject to the following exceptions, and subject also to such duties, rules, regulations and restrictions as shall be established by His Majesty, or by the Governor of the said Settlement, and of the Territories and Dependencies thereof, by virtue of authority derived from His Majesty, and, in the meantime, subject to such duties, rules, regulations, and restrictions as subsisted and were in force, before, and at the time of the conquest of the said Settlement by the arms of His Majesty, with such alterations as have been since made under the authority of the Commander in Chief of His Majesty's Forces at the said Settlement. But it is His Majesty's pleasure that no goods, wares, or merchandize which shall be imported into the said Settlement, or

____________________
1
P.C. 2/170, pp. 353-5.
2
This Order was issued under the authority of 46 Geo. III, cap. 30.

-307-

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