British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

here in preference to Nova Scotia, where it will be out of the power of Government to prevent American oil from coming here free of duty, and from its near situation to the Massachusetts, will be a cover to a great deal of American property and whaling vessels, besides the disadvantage of the nursery of seamen being in America, from whence it will be difficult to get them in case of a war.

Your memorialists further request they may have permission to go round the Cape of Good Hope, where they are credibly informed there are great numbers of whales, and as the fishery at the Brasils has been carried on about 10 years, the whales from the great numbers killed and wounded begin to be wilder, which in time will make success more precarious; but could they obtain permission to go round the Cape they have no doubt of success.

Your memorialists likewise request that the duty of £18 3/- per ton on American and all other foreign train oil may continue, as an inducement for the Nantucketers to settle here [i.e. instead of in Nova Scotia],1 and for the encouragement of the seamen to go in this fishery, we recommend that the harpooners, boat steerers, and line managers be protected in case of a war.

Your memorialists submit this plan for your Lordships' approbation, if anything more, or different, from what is above suggested, should be thought necessary to guard against frauds and impositions respecting the bounty which they pray for, or against clandestinely importing American or other foreign oil they will very readily conform thereto. . . .


61
NEWFOUNDLAND FISHERY: REPORT OF THE COMMITTEE FOR TRADE, 17 March 17862

. . . And the Committee having perused and considered a representation of the Lords Commissioners for Trade and Plantations, made to His Majesty King George the first in 1718 which gives a very full account of the state of the Newfoundland fishery previous to that

____________________
1
This proposal made by Governor John Parr of Nova Scotia on 27 July 1785 (C.O. 217/57) was objectionable to whalers in Britain because the Nantucketers would there be able to retain their old connexions with the Boston merchants. In May 1786 the Committee for Trade did consider inducements to attract the Nantucketers to Britain and Parr was reproved for his proposed action. In 1790 Stokes was sent by Grenville to negotiate the emigration of the Nantucket whalers to Milford Haven. By then the Southern Whalers were well established in Britain and, fearing their competition and experience, preferred to dispense with their services.
2
BT. 5/3, PP. 471-7. The impending expiration of the bounties paid for British vessels from Europe in Pallister's Act of 1775 had led to a reconsideration of this question in January 1786. This report is very similar in reasoning to those of 1671 and 1718. In Jenkinson's view Newfoundland was to be considered still as a great ship moored off the fishing banks, not as a colony or place for settlement with its attendant problems--and possibility of secession.

-369-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 622

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.