British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

[3. No buildings to be erected within 300 yards of the high-water mark. 4. Existing buildings to be allowed to remain at the Governor's discretion. Finally, the Committee consider the seventh clause of the Bill which would have repealed the provision of the earlier Act that reserved half of the fishermen's wages until their return, in order to discourage settlement.]

It is true, however, that in the case of boys or green men, who may not receive above the sum of £7 10 for their voyage, the half may not always be sufficient for their clothing. The Committee are therefore of opinion that the said clause of the Bill may be so far amended as to allow a sum not exceeding £5 10 to be advanced to green men and boys, though it amounts to more than half their wages, provided the master continues equally bound to bring back such green men and boys at the end of the season. . . .1


62
SOUTHERN WHALE FISHERY: MINUTES OF THE COMMITTEE FOR TRADE March and May 1786

17 March 1786. [Evidence.]2 At the Council Chamber, Whitehall.

Committee of Council appointed for the consideration of all matters relating to trade and foreign plantations.

Mr. Samuel Enderby and Sons, Mr. Alexander Champion and John St. Barbe, merchants concerned in the Southern Whale Fishery, attended and were examined as follows.

Q. How many ships were fitted out for this trade in the year 1783?

A. Four from London which went upon the Southern Whale Fishery and 4 from Poole and one from Bristol which went to Newfoundland.

Q. How many in 1784?

A. Fourteen from the port of London for the Southern Whale Fishery, and one which was supposed went no further than Gibraltar. It is to be understood that these ships returned in the above mentioned year, but fitted out in each preceding year.

Q. How many in the year 1785?

A. Seventeen for the Southern Whale Fishery, and one for Gibraltar, all which may return in the course of this year.

____________________
1
On 29 March 1786 Jenkinson introduced a Bill to preserve the Newfoundland Fishery as a nursery for British seamen on the lines recommended here; but it failed, as its author confessed to Chalmers in April 1792 (B.T. 6/57), to achieve its purpose. Dartmouth and Poole lost their monopoly and larger ships from other ports came to the fisheries, manned by fewer men. Newfoundland became increasingly important as a commercial concern and less so as a 'nursery'. The wars curtailed the operations of the fishing-fleets from Britain, and the Newfoundland Fishery became more and more a resident occupation. A Judicature Act, which recognized the need to establish law and order, was renewed regularly after 1792 and was made permanent in 1809--the basis of the legal structure of a colony.
2
B.T. 5/3, PP. 263-6.

-372-

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