British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

Committee are of opinion that it may tend to encourage the spirit of adventure, to promote navigation, and to render this fishery still more extensive and beneficial to this country, if, with the consent of those corporations who may now claim an exclusive right to navigate the seas before mentioned, the ships and vessels employed in this fishery might be permitted to pass the said Capes and to carry on their fishery in the seas beyond them, under proper limitations and restrictions, and it is with this view principally that the Committee have recommended the larger set of the premiums before mentioned.1


63
SOUTHERN WHALE FISHERY: MINUTE OF THE COMMITTEE FOR TRADE, 26 December 17972

Read. --A Memorial of the merchant-adventurers in the Southern Whale-Fishery, stating that it is absolutely necessary that the vessels employed on the southern whale-fishery should put into some ports or islands in the Pacific Ocean for the purpose of refreshing their crews, which they are prevented from doing by the war between Great Britain and Spain; representing, at the same time, that they have strong reason to suppose that the spermaceti whale and seal fishery might be carried on to great advantage at Kerguelen's Land, in the Indian Ocean, off the coasts of New Holland, the New Hebrides, New Caledonia, New Zealand, the Philippine Islands, and Formosa, but that by the Act of Parliament of the 35th of His present Majesty, cap. 92, sec. 19, such vessels are restrained from proceeding further north than the Equator and further east than 51 degrees of east longitude, and consequently from carrying on the fishery at and near the places above mentioned, where they might procure the refreshments they stand in need of, and consequently escape the risk of capture; and therefore praying that the restriction above mentioned may be taken off, and that a Bill may be immediately brought

____________________
1
On 5 May Jenkinson introduced a measure, which incorporated these recommendations, into the Commons. He claimed (justifiably) that the policy soon became 'wonderfully successful' (Add. MSS. 38, 310, p. 9); and Enderby was not ungrateful for the expanding prosperity and paid tribute to him in 1795, calling the Southern Whale Fishery 'the child of your Lordship's policy' (Add. MSS. 38,230, pp. 313 ff.). The East India Company agreed to admit limited whaling in the Indian Ocean and South-West Pacific by an agreement of 1788 (see B.T. 5/5, PP. 53-55).
2

B.T. 5/11, pp. 43-45. Printed in Hist. Records of New Zealand, vol. i, Wellington 1908, p. 216. Fur traders in Nootka Sound and whalers off Patagonia had come into conflict with the Spanish claims of monopoly of navigation and trade, but these had been settled by the Convention of October 1790. New opportunities were now waiting, and further extensions of the boundaries of the fishery were negotiated with the East India, South Sea, and Hudson's Bay Companies in 1791-3 to admit whaling in the eastern Pacific (33 Geo. III, cap. 58). See also B.T. 5/7, PP. 74-80. Spermaceti whales were said to be more abundant off the coasts of Australia and New Zealand than off South America.

-378-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 622

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.