British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

their example of industry and enterprise would not have been more useful to the province and at the same time have sooner extended amongst the old inhabitants.1 . . .


2
QUEBEC: HUGH FINLAY TO EVAN NEPEAN 4 April 17882

Quebec.

DEAR SIR,

Many are the applications to the Governor General, from people residing in the United States for lands in this province, wishing to see themselves once more under a free government , where the laws protect the person and property of the subject.

Opinions are divided here with regard to the policy of admitting these men as settlers among us, lest they import and diffuse principles adverse to the British constitution I have always been of opinion that a half of the people of the colonies, now the States, have, some from prejudices early imbibed and others from a thorough investigation of the nature of the government, been sincerely attached to the British interest during the late rebellion, though they did not take arms, and that they are still attached to it. Many who were but lukewarm in our cause, and some who were opposers of the King's authority are now convinced of their folly and live to repent at leisure. . . . If the King's ministers will receive the repentant sinners of the revolted colonies, I conceive we might have an addition of twenty or thirty thousand souls to the number of His Majesty's subjects in this province, in twelve months. I firmly believe that a majority of the four Eastern States sincerely desire to return to their allegiance. . . .


3
UPPER CANADA: LIEUT.-GOVERNOR J. G. SIMCOE TO HENRY DUNDAS 2 June 17913

. . . The form of government which has been already bestowed on Upper Canada may be considered as the foundation of this important

____________________
1
In evidence before the Committee for Trade on 9 February 1788 Adam Lym- burner declared that some 10,000 Loyalists were settled above Montreal alone, were growing 'more corn than was necessary for their own consumption', and were proving a good example to the French Canadians for improved farming (B.T. 5/5, pp. 38-39).
2
[C.O. 42/87, f. 631]: quoted from H. A. Innis and A. R. M. Lower, Select Documents in Canadian Economic History, Toronto 1929, p. 13. Hugh Finlay had been a member of the Governor's Council since 1765 and deputy Postmaster- General of British North America since 1774.
3
C.O. 42/316, pp. 323-7. The dispatch as printed in the Simcoe Papers (vol. I, p. 27) is dated 30 June.

-391-

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