British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

in the same manner as those of the grant, in respect whereof it is made, the grantee knowing both the quantum and situation of such reservation, as well as of his grant encloses the residue at his own risk and expense, as at present, but with as much certainty as if there was no reservation at all. The size of the lots may be determined with this particular view--each containing two seventh parts (the amount of the reservation) more than it otherwise would.

The question then to be determined would be in what part of every lot the reservation should be made? Whether according to one uniform system, by adopting in all cases the rule of drawing the boundaries of the reserve by parallelograms of which the lines which run from north to south shall be the longest, or by any other similar fixed rule, or by occasional variations in this respect, guided however by an uniform principle operating according to known differences of circumstance and situation.

The decision of this question must at least in the first instance be left for local consideration, but I have the King's commands to instruct you not to consent to any system even provisionally, which does not carefully keep in view the general idea of rendering the reserves as beneficial as was intended by the Act.

And particularly you are expressly enjoined to take care that in such townships as border upon the water, the reserved lands shall be so situated as to enjoy their full proportion of that advantage according to the relative quantities of the private grants, and the reserves as established by the Act. . . .


6
UPPER CANADA : HENRY DUNDAS TO LIEUT.-GOVERNOR SIMCOE, 12 July 17921

. . . With respect to the great emigrations which may take place, either from the American States or elsewhere, I am of opinion that in the very infancy of the province under your government such emigrations would not be productive of all the good consequences which your mind on the first impression may suggest to you. Population is often the effect, but never I believe was or will be the cause, of the prosperity of any country. It is not (taken exclusively) found to be the true measure either of the strength, the riches or the happiness of a country. I am well aware that what is true and applies in many instances may not apply to a country of the extent of Upper Canada; but an ingrafted population (if I may so call it) to a great extent, and outrunning (as it must do) all those regulations, laws, usages and customs, which grow up and go hand in hand with a progressive and regular population, must I conceive in all cases be attended with a

____________________
1
C.O. 43/10

-395-

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