British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

doubt the result will be a conviction of the necessity of returning to the restrictive system.

It requires an intimate acquaintance with the subject to be aware of the various species of fraud by which emigrants are imposed upon, one very common one is exhibited in the newspaper which I enclose; two vessels advertised there are stated at more than double their actual tonnage, the ignorance that can be imposed upon by such a device surely requires to be protected.

I shall not apologise for this freedom, believing that the importance of the subject will at all events recommend my letter to attention.

I am very respectfully thy sincere friend,

WM. TODHUNTER.


17
NOVA SCOTIA: REPORT OF A COMMITTEE OF THE COUNCIL, 20 November 18271

[ Halifax]

The Committee of His Majesty's Council appointed to examine the accounts rendered for the expenses of the hospital established at Bankhead for the reception and relief of the sick among the unfortunate emigrants who arrived during the season from Ireland:

Report that they have examined the said accounts and find regular vouchers for all the payments. They think that the establishment has been conducted with as much attention to economy as was practicable, and that the public are much indebted to the zeal, activity, and humanity of the Committee appointed by His Excellency and the Commissioners of the Poor for the town of Halifax, by whose unremitting exertions the distresses of the unfortunate sufferers have been much alleviated and the progress of disease checked.

The Committee cannot close this report without calling the attention of His Excellency and the Board to the pernicious effects which have ensued from the removal of those regulations which the wisdom and benevolence of Parliament established for the government of vessels bringing emigrant passengers from the mother country. These unfortunate beings are no longer protected by the wholesome restraint which was formerly imposed upon the cupidity and want of principle of those who engage to provide them with passages across the Atlantic, and are now crammed together on board of vessels without any adequate means of subsistence, without medical aid, or room to afford them decent accommodation. Under these circumstances disease is inevitable, and the wretched beings are not only thrown on shore in a state which renders them incapable of procuring their own

____________________
1
C.O. 217/147, pp. 315-17. Enclosed in Kempt to Huskisson, 25 November 1827.

-419-

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