British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

(Enclosure.)

Number of convicts sent to New South Wales from England between January 1810, and January 1817, distinguishing the number in each year.

MalesFemales
1810200120
181140099
1812400127
1813500119
1814800232
1815880101
1816998101
Total4,178899

N.B.--The above is exclusive of convicts sent from Ireland, which within the seven years have amounted to about 1,400 male and female.


35
GOVERNOR MACQUARIE TO LORD BATHURST 16 May 18181

. . . As one certain means of greatly reducing the present very heavy expenses of this colony, I would strongly but respectfully recommend that no more poor settlers should be permitted to come out to this colony for at least three years to come; these poor settlers, that come out as such, are in fact the ruin of the country, their sole dependence being placed on what is termed here 'their indulgences' from Government; for the moment these indulgences cease, they contrive in some underhand way to sell their farms and take to lawless pursuits, keeping low public houses, or becoming itinerant merchants, hawkers and pedlars. If therefore, instead of allowing those poor men, decayed tradesmen and merchants and idle profligate adventurers to come out to this colony, as settlers, it were confined to respectable monied men, who could support themselves, set a good example of industry to the other colonists, and be able each to take six or eight male convict servants or labourers off the store, the expenses of the colony would very greatly be reduced thereby, and the colony itself would rapidly increase, not only in wealth, but in respectability and importance. I therefore most earnestly recommend to your Lordship to consider and adopt this plan, giving it a fair trial for at least three years from the 1st of January next, allowing no person whatsoever, after that date, to come out as a settler to this colony, who cannot produce a satisfactory proof that he not only possesses, but brings out with him, a clear capital of at least five hundred pounds to be paid out in the

____________________
1

C.O. 201/90. Printed in H.R.A., Series I, vol. ix ( 1917), pp. 797-8.

-443-

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