British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

39
COLONIAL OFFICE CONDITIONS FOR LAND GRANTS AT SWAN RIVER, 5 December 18281

Although it is the intention of His Majesty's Government to form a settlement on the western coast of Australia, the Government do not intend to incur any expense in conveying settlers or in supplying them with necessaries after their arrival.

Such persons, however, as may be prepared to proceed to that country at their own cost before the end of the year 1829, in parties comprehending a proportion of not less than five female to six male settlers, will receive grants of land in fee simple (free of quit rent), proportioned to the capital which they may invest upon public or private objects in the colony, to the satisfaction of His Majesty's Government at home, certified by the Superintendent or other officer administering the colonial government, at the rate of forty acres for every sum of £3 so invested, provided they give previous security; first, that all supplies sent to the colony, whether of provisions, stores or other articles, which may be purchased by the capitalists there, or which shall have been sent out for the use of them or their parties on the requisition of the Secretary of State, if not paid for on delivery in the colony, shall be paid for at home, each capitalist being to be held liable in his proportion; and, secondly, that, on the event of the establishment being broken up by the Governor or Superintendent, all persons desirous of returning to the British Islands, shall be conveyed to their own home at the expense of the capitalist by whom they may have been taken out. The passages of labouring persons, whether paid for by themselves or others, and whether they be male or female, provided the proportion of the sexes before mentioned be preserved, will be considered as an investment of capital entitling the party by whom any such payment may have been made to an allowance of land at the rate of £15, that is, of 200 acres of land for the passage of every such labouring person over and above any other investment of capital.

Any land thus granted, which shall not have been brought into cultivation, or otherwise improved or reclaimed from its wild state, to the satisfaction of Government, within twenty-one years from the date of the grant, shall, at the end of the twenty-one years, revert absolutely to the Crown. All these conditions with respect to free grants of land, and all contracts of labouring persons and others, who shall have bound themselves for a stipulated term of service, will be strictly maintained. It is not intended that any convicts or other

____________________
1

C.O. 18/1. Printed in H.R.A., Series III, vol. vi ( 1923), pp. 594-5. Enclosed in R. W. Hay's reply to the memorial from Thomas Peel (and others) to Sir George Murray, 14 November 1828 (see ibid., p. 588). The more detailed regulations for intending emigrants are also printed (ibid., p. 606).

-449-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 622

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.