British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

adopted, which, if persevered in, with the modification herein suggested, will secure the advantages that can fairly be expected from the maintenance of that settlement. . . .

Resolved, 4. That it is the opinion of this Committee, that although it may be desirable to retain the settlement of Sierra Leone for the purposes of trade, and to protect the blacks already located there, yet it appears to this Committee, that those objects may be attained at a very small expense, and that the greater part of the present establishments may be gradually and safely withdrawn. . . .

[The Select Committee also recommends that the Mixed Commission Court for the trial of captured slave ships should be removed from Sierra Leone to the more convenient situation of Fernando Po.]


E.THE '1820 SETTLERS' IN CAPE COLONY

52
LORD BATHURST TO GOVERNOR LORD CHARLES SOMERSET, 28 July 18171

MY LORD,

Various applications have during the last year been addressed to His Majesty's Government by persons who are desirous of emigrating from this country and forming establishments in the colonies; and the Cape of Good Hope has been more than once selected by them as the one in which they have considered it likely that a settlement might be attended with success. I have however deferred giving any particular encouragement to such undertakings or entering into a discussion of the terms upon which the parties were willing to engage in them, because I was desirous in the first instance of ascertaining your Lordship's sentiments as to the success of an extensive settlement of European cultivators at the Cape, and as to the nature and degree of encouragement which it would be possible or probable to afford to them; but as the desire of emigrating continues to prevail, I am anxious to receive from your Lordship such information as may enable me in reply to the several applicants to state the principle upon which settlements at the Cape would be established, and the degree of encouragement it would receive.

In affording me such information you will not fail to consider, 1st What species of cultivation it would be advisable to promote in preference to others. 2ndly Whether in granting lands it would be advisable to make a considerable grant to one individual who might procure subordinate labourers for its cultivation, or whether small grants to individual cultivators would not be preferable.

____________________
1
C.O. 49/12. Printed in R.C.C., vol. xi, pp. 363-4.

-466-

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