British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview
agreed to the following rules and regulations for the better protection of lawful commerce:--

The paths shall be perfectly open and free to all persons engaged in lawful traffic; and persons molesting them in any way whatever, or forcing them to purchase at any particular market, or influencing them by any unfair means whatever, shall be declared guilty of infringing this Treaty, and be liable to the severest punishment.

Panyarring, denouncing, and swearing, on or by any person or thing whatever, are hereby strictly forbidden, and all persons infringing this rule shall be rigorously punished; and no master or chief shall be answerable for the crimes of his servants, unless done by his orders or consent, or when under his control.

As the King of Ashantee has renounced all right or title to any tribute or homage from the Kings of Dinkara, Assin, and others formerly his subjects, so, on the other hand, these parties are strictly prohibited from insulting, by improper speaking or in any other way, their former master, such conduct being calculated to produce quarrels and wars.

All 'palavers' are to be decided in the manner mentioned in the terms and conditions of peace already agreed to by the parties to this Treaty.

Signed in the Great Hall of Cape Coast Castle, this 27th day of April, 1831, by the parties to this Treaty, and sealed with the great Seal of the Colony in their presence.

GEORGE MACLEAN, Governor.1



MESSRS. BARNES, BROWN, AND FORSTER TO R. W. HAY, 25 July 18312

. . . You have already been informed by Mr. Forster, one of our Members, that the President and Council at Cape Coast Castle had at length succeeded in re-establishing the peace of the Gold Coast;

____________________
1
Lieut. Maclean had been aide-de-camp to Campbell and private secretary to Lumley. In 1830 he had been appointed President (not formally Governor) of the Council of Cape Coast Castle. Eleven years later a Select Committee paid him the following tribute: 'We fully admit the merits of that administration, whether we look to the Officer employed, Captain Maclean, or to the Committee under whom he has acted, which, with the miserable pittance of between 3,500 £. and 4,000 £. a year, has exercised, from the four ill-provided Forts of Dixcove, Cape Coast, Annamaboe, and British Accra, manned by a few ill-paid black soldiers, a very wholesome influence over a Coast not much less than 150 miles in extent, and to a considerable distance inland; preventing within that range external slave trade, maintaining peace and security, and exercising a useful though irregular jurisdiction, among the neighbouring tribes, and much mitigating and in some cases extinguishing some of the most atrocious practices which had prevailed among them unchecked before.' Parl. Papers, I8 42) (551), vol. xi, p. iv.
2

Parl. Papers, 1865(412), vol. v, p. 437.

-502-

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