British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

part of the same; through which the Commission was enabled now to travel through those places with safety. . . .

In the opinion of the undersigned the most certain means of rendering the incursions of the Caffres difficult, and of curbing their ravages, would be to people the Zuurveld, which cannot be better effected on the part of Government than by granting of lands there; to treat of the manner in which those grants should be made is not the task of the undersigned; but however they cannot avoid remarking to your Excellency that in a district where the breeding and grazing of cattle must constitute the chief subsistence of the inhabitants, extent of pasturage is requisite, and small grants in property will not answer the intention.

For the rest, although the prohibition not to pass the Great Fish River is in general very useful and necessary in order to cut off the communication with the Caffres, exceptions however should be made when the Caffres may steal cattle and escape with them over the same, and consequently get them into their possession with security; in this case the pioneers or the commandos should be at liberty to pursue them and to pass the river towards obtaining their stolen cattle back, provided that as soon as they gained their object they should return. This would generally be attended with the wished for success, and would probably tend to discourage the Caffres from plunder, as they, seeing that they could not enjoy the fruits thereof, would lose all inclination of making attacks, while at the same time they could be made to feel the danger of being driven over the Kat River, in case they did not discontinue their incursions and robberies, which has been described to the undersigned as a better line of boundary than the Great Fish River. . . .


23
INSTRUCTIONS TO JOHN MELVILLE ON HIS APPOINTMENT AS GOVERNMENT AGENT AT GRIQUA TOWN, 21 March 18221

SIR,

His Excellency the Governor having taken into his consideration the repeated statements which have been brought before him of the dissensions which have prevailed among the Griquas, and of their dissatisfaction at the conduct of the heemraden appointed by the Earl of Caledon, when Governor of this colony, has come to the resolution of accepting your offer, to proceed thither to reside at that

____________________
1

Parl. Papers, 1835 (50), vol. xxxix, pp. 211-12. Signed by the Colonial Secretary, Christopher Bird. The Griquas were a people of mixed European and Hottentot race collected from wandering tribes by L.M.S. missionaries such as Anderson, and induced to settle near the junction of the Orange and Vaal rivers to the north of the colony.

-511-

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