British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

17
TRINIDAD: PROCLAMATION BY GOVERNOR WILLIAM MONRO, 31 August 18121

. . . The inhabitants of this island are hereby publicly notified that by the said royal ordinance or cedula it is ordered that within one calendar month from and after the date of this proclamation, every person resident in this island, and who shall be in possession of any plantation, slaves or slave, within the same, whether as proprietor, mortgagee, trustee or receiver, manager or attorney, whatever their title, trust or interest therein may be; or who shall own or possess any slave or slaves whatsoever within this island, whatever his or her tenure of, or title to the same may be, shall respectively make and personally deliver, upon oath, [a full return] either to Henry Murray Esquire, duly appointed according to the said royal ordinance or cedula, Registrar of slaves, or to some other person that shall be by him appointed and deputed to receive the same, in the proper district of this island in which the party to make the same shall reside. . . .


18
LORD CASTLEREAGH TO LORD LIVERPOOL 25 October 18142

MY LORD, Vienna.

I think it right to acquaint your Lordship, that notwithstanding the Duke of Wellington's repeated agitations of the question at Paris, and my own representations to Prince Talleyrand here, no answer whatever has yet been returned to my official note of the 8th instant on the Slave Trade.

The more I have occasion to observe the temper of foreign powers on the question of the abolition, the more strongly impressed I am with a sense of the prejudice that results not only to the interests of the question itself, but of our foreign relations generally from the display of popular impatience which has been excited and is kept up in England upon this subject.

It is impossible to persuade foreign nations that this sentiment is unmixed with views of colonial policy, and their Cabinets, who can better estimate the real and virtuous motives which guide us on this question, see in the very impatience of the nation a powerful instru-

____________________
1
C.O. 298/5. Major-General William Monro was Governor of Trinidad from 1811 to 1813, and was succeeded by Sir Ralph Woodford.
2
F.O. 92/7. Printed in C. K. Webster, op. cit., p. 215. See also Wilberforce and Castlereagh in the debate on the London petition respecting international abolition and the Address to the Prince Regent on 27 June 1814: Parl. Hist., vol. xxviii, 268-84.

-550-

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