British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834

By Vincent Harlow; Frederick Madden | Go to book overview

collars which the owners of slaves may compel them to carry as a punishment. I apprehend that His Majesty's Government have already expressed the most unequivocal disapprobation of all punishments of this nature. If any argument against them were wanting, the instruments of torture, for they are nothing less, which the Commissioners deposited in this office as specimens of the chains and fetters in use in the Colony, would be conclusive on the subject. It is indeed singular that so late as the month of September 1829, the Governor and Council of Mauritius should authorize the chaining together of women and boys of the age of fifteen, and the chaining boys, apart from each other, whatever may be their age. The weight of the chains is indeed regulated, though the Protector is authorized to augment it. There is no attempt to determine the form of these instruments, except that the collar may not have three branches. But two branches are amply sufficient to render the wearer miserable in the extreme. No provision is made respecting the length of time for which these instruments are to be borne, nor respecting the crimes for which they are to be put on.

It would be a waste of time to discuss the merits of such a law as this. It appears to me to demonstrate the unfitness of the Governor and his Council to legislate at all on any subject connected with the condition of the slave population. I would submit to you whether this Act should not be disallowed by His Majesty in Council, and whether the same should not contain an absolute prohibition of the use of chains, collars and fetters in all cases, except for the security in gaol of prisoners who cannot be secured otherwise. . . .

The Ordinance numbered 53, for the amendment of the Slave Law of the Colony, has been superseded by the recent order of His Majesty in Council. . . .1


36
MAURITIUS: LORD GODERICH TO GOVERNOR SIR CHARLES COLVILLE, 28 February 18312

[Ordinance No. 51 respecting the use of chain and fetters is disallowed.]

. . . My predecessor in office, in his despatch of the 8th May 1829, conveyed to you in the strongest terms the expression of His Majesty's

____________________
1
Murray's consolidated Order in Council of 2 February 1930. Mauritius alone among the Crown colonies opposed this Order. Stephen's recommendations were adopted and his comments incorpdrated in the dispatch sent by Murray's successor to Colville (see below, No. 36) notifying him of a disallowance of Ordinance 51. On 2 November 1831 a revised Order in Council was promulgated and sent by Goderich to the Crown colonies three days later. Stephen's memorandum on which Goderich's circular (5 November) was based is printed in K. N. Bell and W. P. Morrell, Select Documents . . ., Oxf. 1928, pp. 372-82.
2
Parl. Papers, 1830-1 (230), vol. xvi, pp. 127-8.

-578-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
British Colonial Developments, 1774-1834
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 622

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.