100 Greatest Science Inventions of All Time

By Kendall Haven | Go to book overview

Introduction
Invention! The mere word stirs the blood and quickens the pulse. Inventions are exciting, even thrilling. An invention feels as exciting as finding buried treasure. It is the creation of something useful where nothing existed before. Invention is a sure expression of practical genius. The world is a fuller, richer place because of an invention.Why study inventions? Studying inventions is an effective way to track the progress and development of societies. Inventions form a roadmap of the history of human development. They are the physical manifestation of the best human ingenuity and cleverness. Inventions form the leading edge of development and technology in each age and culture. It is impossible to study the history of human science and development without turning to inventions.In this book I present the 100 greatest of all science inventions. In each entry I describe the process of, and effect of, each of these major inventions. This book will be a useful tool for teachers and students to learn about inventions and their critical role in human development. These stories introduce the process of inventions and the most important inventions.I had four purposes in mind as I wrote this book:
1. I want to present the nature and scope of past great inventions and show their importance to our modern lives.
2. I want to place each of these specific inventions within the continuum of technological development. I want to show what came before and what came after each great invention.
3. I want to clearly show students that the world around them is created by, and defined by, these master inventions that are woven into the fabric of our daily existence.
4. I want to show the role of science and of the scientific process in the process of invention.

But what is an invention? Where does invention stop and discovery start? Is there a dividing line between the two? When I was a seventh grader, I remember thinking that Isaac Newton invented gravity. And I wondered how people held onto the earth and how far they could throw a baseball before Newton invented gravity.

Then I learned that he didn’t invent gravity. It existed long before Newton or any other human set foot on the earth. You can’t invent something that already exists.

Then did Newton discover gravity? No again. Scientists had known about gravity for hundreds of years before Newton was born. To discover something, you have to be the first one to detect or become aware of the thing being discovered.

So, what did Newton do for gravity? Why do we associate his name with gravity? Newton invented mathematical expressions that accurately described gravity, and he in-

-xiii-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
100 Greatest Science Inventions of All Time
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 336

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.