100 Greatest Science Inventions of All Time

By Kendall Haven | Go to book overview

Caravel (Sailing Ship)
Year of Invention: 1410

What Is It? The first long-distance, transoceanic sailing ship.

Who Invented It? Prince Henry (in Lisbon, Portugal)


Why Is This Invention One of the 100 Greatest?

The first Portuguese Caravel set sail thousands of years after the first ship equipped with a sail. But the Portuguese-built Caravel redefined the world as no other ship had done. It expanded Europe’s reach across the globe.

The Caravel made global ship navigation possible. Like the Apollo capsules were in space, the Caravel was an explorer built to venture into seas and parts of the world no other European had been able to reach. The Caravel opened Africa to European exploration (and exploitation).

A Caravel was the first ship to round Cape Bojador (the tip of West Africa). Using Caravels, the Portuguese discovered the Islands of Madeira and the Azores, both in the open Atlantic Ocean. Columbus sailed three Caravels to discover the New World. A Caravel was the first ship to round Cape Horn at the southern tip of Africa and venture into Indian Ocean waters. The Caravel set the stage for Europe’s ocean trade and colonization across Africa, India, and the Americas.


History of the Invention

What Did People Do Before?

Few early ships relied exclusively on the wind. Cargo and military boats were designed with long rows of oars that propelled the boats when winds and currents did not flow the right way. War galleys—the most advanced ship designs—were rigged with a single mast and square sail to travel with the wind and as many as three rows of oars to power and maneuver the ship during battle. As late as 1571, Christian and Turkish fleets were rowed to war for the Battle of Lepanto. Ship captains used wind when it was handy and the backs and sweat of their sailors (and slaves) when it was not.

-45-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
100 Greatest Science Inventions of All Time
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 336

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.