Defending the Free World: John F. Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, and the Vietnam War, 1961-1965

By Orrin Schwab | Go to book overview

Toward the Press Conference Speech

The period from Pleiku through the Johnson press conference of July 1965 is one of die most closely studied in U.S. foreign policy. As a case study, the subject is extraordinarily rich and important. The existing literature suggests a collision of competing interests leading to a thin consensus brought together in Johnson's final decision to expand the war. Interpretations have differed over whether it was rational or irrational, and which factors played the greatest role in the development of the American ground war.1 From the perspective of the technocratic synthesis, the six months that led up to the ground war saw a continuation of the same institutional relationships that had existed within the Vietnam policy process for years. While often chaotic at the level of decision making, overall, U.S. foreign policy remained a self-organizing system. The expansion of American power into Indochina remained part of the larger structure of Cold War technocratic planning. To the degree that planning failed or was misconceived is one question; how that structure showed fundamental aspects of the workings of the American state is another.

In Washington and Honolulu and Saigon, hawks and doves, Wilsonians, political and military realists, and managerial internationalists engaged in ongoing reiterative arguments over new policy proposals. Just how many troops, how many jets and helicopters, how much aid and how much risk the United States would take were argued intensively through the summer of 1965 and then beyond. The excellent documentation that we have in the historical record outlines the planning for the intervention. The planning involved an intellectual process that affected every branch of the government and worked on every level of American society. In a real sense, Vietnam War planning was practiced by American diplomats in every diplomatic mission and employed scientists, spies, and all manner of analysts, consultants, and administrators around the world. The intervention, driven by the grip of historical memory and by the exigencies of politics, doctrine, and planning, remains rich in meaning.

-153-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Defending the Free World: John F. Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, and the Vietnam War, 1961-1965
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Recent Titles in Praeger Studies in Diplomacy and Strategic Thought ii
  • Defending the Free World - John E Kennedy, Lyndon Johnson, and the Vietnam War, 1961–1965 iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xi
  • Abbreviations xiii
  • 1: Defending the Free World: 1961 1
  • 2: The Coup 37
  • 3: Toward the Gulf of Tonkin 81
  • 4: Pleiku 115
  • 5: Toward the Press Conference Speech 153
  • Selected Bibliography 225
  • Index 235
  • About the Author 245
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 250

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.