Richard Nixon, Watergate, and the Press: A Historical Retrospective

By Louis W. Liebovich | Go to book overview

Appendix A
Cast of Nixon Characters

Richard M. Nixon, president, January 20, 1969, to August 9, 1974

Spiro Agnew, vice president, resigned October 10, 1973

Gerald R. Ford, vice president, December 6, 1973, to August 8, 1974; president August 9, 1974, to January 20, 1977

Harry Robbins (Bob) Haldeman, chief of staff, resigned April 30, 1973

John Ehrlichman, chief advisor for domestic affairs, resigned April 30, 1973

Patrick Buchanan, speechwriter and presidential aide

Herbert Klein, director of communications (succeeded in June 1973 by Kenneth Clawson)

Ronald Ziegler, press secretary

Diane Sawyer, Ziegler aide

Dwight Chapin, Nixon appointments secretary

Alexander Butterfield, presidential aide who revealed the existence of the taping system during Senate Watergate Committee testimony in July 1973

Charles Colson, presidential aide (chief hatchet man)

John Dean, counsel to the president (in charge of the cover-up); revealed the cover-up during June 25, 1973, testimony before the Watergate Committee; author of the statement to Nixon on March 21, 1972: “There is a cancer on the presidency.” Resigned April 30, 1973

Rose Mary Woods, Nixon’s secretary; forced to claim she accidentally erased 18½ minutes of the June 20, 1972, conversation between Nixon and Haldeman

Daniel Ellsberg, national security advisor under Lyndon Johnson who leaked the Pentagon Papers to the press in 1971

Lewis Fielding, Ellsberg’s psychiatrist; his office in Beverly Hills was burglarized in September 1971 by the “plumbers,” who were trying to get negative information about Ellsberg

Ben Bradlee, executive editor of Washington Post; in charge of the Watergate investigation

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