Computers, Phones, and the Internet: Domesticating Information Technology

By Robert Kraut; Malcolm Brynin et al. | Go to book overview

1
Social Studies of
Domestic Information and
Communication Technologies

Why Study the New Information
and Communication Technologies?

Malcolm Brynin

Robert Kraut

In the 20th century, new information technology has the potential to influence the lives of ordinary citizens as much as it has influenced business, education, and government. In many of the countries in Europe, North America, and Asia, the majority of individuals and households are using personal computers, the Internet, and mobile telephones. In the United States, this equipment is often referred to as information technology. In Europe, the phrase “information and communication technologies” is more commonly used and is abbreviated to ICTs. This book is about the potential effect of these new technologies, as they enter our homes and our daily lives, to change the range of activities we pursue, the way we perform old activities, our relationships with other people, and our personal and economic welfare. But will the new ICTs have a significant social effect, and if they do, will the change be positive? This book contributes to the investigations needed to answer these questions.

Toward the end of his book The Coming of PostIndustrial Society, Daniel Bell (1973) argues that before the industrial revolution, humankind confronted nature; through the industrial revolution, we confronted a sort of “fabricated nature.” However, the “post-industrial society is essentially a game between persons” (p. 488). In the new knowledge society, there is at one level simply more social interaction, but at another level, we also face new social challenges. The new technologies we discuss in this volume are a part of this new social and human environment.

In a sense, of course, nothing is new. Although computers, the Internet, and mobile phones are new technologies, the debate over the effects of technology on personal lives is old. In The Republic, Plato warned against the pernicious effects of consuming the mass media of the day (drama and poetry), because viewers and readers might have difficulty distinguishing fact from fiction and might emulate the worst rather than the best behavior of the tragic heroes. Such ancient concerns are a strange echo of current social science research findings and argument; for instance, it is said that television and computer games promote violence or other negative behavior (Anderson et al., 2003).

Psychologists, sociologists, and communication scholars have long been interested in the effect on everyday life of broadcast media such as radio and television (e.g., Janowitz & Hirsch, 1981; BallRokeach & Cantor, 1986; Gurevitch & Levy, 1987;

-3-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Computers, Phones, and the Internet: Domesticating Information Technology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 326

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.