Computers, Phones, and the Internet: Domesticating Information Technology

By Robert Kraut; Malcolm Brynin et al. | Go to book overview

17
The Internet and
Social Interaction
A Meta-analysis and Critique
of Studies, 1995–2003

Irina Shklovski

Sara Kiesler

Robert Kraut

Internet adoption in homes has grown rapidly since the early 1990s. By 2003, 63% of Americans had used the Internet (Pew Internet and American Life Project, 2003). The Internet has been hailed as a revolutionary social technology, in part because its predominant use has been informal communication (Kraut, Mukhopadhyay, Szczypula, Kiesler, & Scherlis, 1999). Even as new services, such as downloading music and movies, become available and easier to accomplish, communication remains the public’s principle use of the Internet (Pew Internet and American Life Project, 2002; U.S. Department of Commerce, 2002).

One important implication of the Internet’s migration to homes and its predominant use for communication is that it could change people’s social interaction with their closest ties. Social interaction with family and friends is one of life’s most pleasant experiences (Robinson & Godbey, 1999). It helps fulfill people’s need to belong and often leads to feelings of closeness (Baumeister & Leary, 1995), to perceptions of social support (Gottlieb & Green, 1984; Peirce, Frone, Russell, Cooper, & Mudar, 2000), and to increases in the likelihood of receiving social support (Cohen & Wills, 1985; Wellman & Wortley, 1990). Social interaction is also associated with people’s commitment to groups, neighborhoods, and organizations (Mirowsky & Ross, 1989; Schachter, 1951), with their sense of meaning in life (Thoits, 1983) and with their adherence to social norms (Srole, 1956).

Some researchers have argued that the Internet improves people’s ability to form new close relationships, especially if they are otherwise isolated (McKenna & Bargh, 2000). Early studies indicated that the Internet facilitated the development of group ties (Sproull & Kiesler, 1991), information exchange in organizations (Kraut & Attewell, 1997), and the creation of new groups and organizations (Sproull & Faraj, 1995). Overall, do such changes add up to an increase or reduction in people’s social interaction with the most important people in their lives—their family and friends? In this chapter, we examine what is now known about the effects of using the Internet on peoples’ social interaction with these close ties.


The Social Impact Debate

In 1995, Katz and Aspden conducted the first national survey of the public’s use of the Internet. They reported that Internet users had more total contact with family members than did nonusers, and that they made more new friends, including those they

-251-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Computers, Phones, and the Internet: Domesticating Information Technology
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 326

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Author Advanced search

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.