The First Fifty Years of the Rhodes Trust and the Rhodes Scholarships, 1903-1953

By Godfrey Elton | Go to book overview

CHAPTER II
LORD LOTHIAN AND THE YEARS OF PEACE

IN 1925 Philip Kerr, afterwards eleventh Marquess of Lothian, took over the General Secretaryship. His was to be the first tenure of considerable length and he could hardly have been better equipped for it. Like his predecessor, he was a New College man, who had served as Secretary to Mr. Lloyd George while Mr. Lloyd George was Prime Minister. After Oxford, where he took a First in History, he had gone to South Africa as junior member of Milner's famous 'Kindergarten', and had taken an active part in bringing about the Act of Union and later had edited the Round Table. Wylie wrote of him:

The informality of his bearing, while it could not hide the fine breeding which underlay it, helped him to get quickly on an easy footing with anyone with whom he might be thrown. He was prepared to find anyone interesting who could tell him things he wanted to know; and there was scarcely any limit in the things that Philip Kerr wanted to know.

He would make friends, for the Rhodes Trust and himself, all over the Commonwealth and, very notably, in the United States. He worked with astonishing speed and his many interests and varied contacts all enriched his service to the Trust. His most disconcerting characteristic, a recurrent tendency to fall suddenly asleep at inopportune moments, was all the more alarming since he was much addicted to driving powerful cars at high speeds. Between 1925 and 1939, when he was to become British Ambassador in Washington, many large problems of reorganization and policy were to confront the Trust, and on all of them Lothian left the stamp of his luminous and friendly intelligence. When I succeeded him, in the summer of 1939, he told me that, so far as he could see, all the major problems had been solved. He

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The First Fifty Years of the Rhodes Trust and the Rhodes Scholarships, 1903-1953
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • EDITOR''s FOREWORD vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Contents xi
  • Chapter I- THE BEGINNINGS xiii
  • Chapter II- Lord Lothian and the Years of Peace 16
  • Chapter III- World War Again 33
  • Chapter IV- The New Era 44
  • II- THE RHODES SCHOLARS AND OXFORD 1902-31 57
  • Chapter II- First Arrivals 77
  • Chapter III- Settling Down 92
  • Chapter IV- War 103
  • Chapter V- Change 111
  • III- THE RHODES SCHOLARS AND OXFORD 1931-52 127
  • Chapter II- The System at Work 134
  • Chapter III- The Second World War 161
  • Chapter IV- Peace and Its Problems 174
  • IV- THE AMERICAN SCHOLARSHIPS 183
  • Chapter II- Post-War Changes 202
  • V- RECORDS AND STATISTICS 217
  • Appendix TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS OF THE RHODES TRUST 1955 267
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