Becoming an Author: Advice for Academics and Other Professionals

By David Canter; Gavin Fairbairn | Go to book overview

Preface

As friends for many years, who met each other at various family and social gatherings, we have often compared notes on the parallels between our rather different academic experiences. Gavin is a jobbing philosopher, whose published output spans applied ethics, higher education, special education, nursing and social care. After a career in special education and social work he taught in teacher education for many years, and has also made significant contributions to education and professional development in both nursing and social care. These activities contrast with the data collection and statistical analysis around which much of David’s teaching and research have evolved, and the more popular writing he has done for newspapers and general audiences, including his award-winning book Criminal Shadows. Furthermore, his professional career has focused on supervising postgraduate students in psychology, architecture and, more recently, criminology, working in an environment in which publication is expected to be commonplace.

Between us we have worked with the full gamut of people starting out on academic and professional lives in which publishing might, and often would, play a part. Some of them, it has to be admitted, have been on the cusp of illiteracy when they first sought to become authors. Others have been more fluent than was necessarily good for them – pouring out their thoughts in uncontrolled torrents, with never a sideward glance at those who might consider reading what they wrote, or perhaps more importantly, at those who might consider publishing it. Some have had a clear mission from the start and knew what they wanted to contribute, though not necessarily how; even more common have been people with a desire to break into print but little confidence that they could do it.

-vii-

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Becoming an Author: Advice for Academics and Other Professionals
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Becoming an Author - Advice for Academics and Other Professionals iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • About the Authors xi
  • 1: Publishing Without Perishing 1
  • 2: The Author’s Journey 10
  • 3: Varieties of Publication 23
  • 4: Beyond the Blank Page 34
  • 5: The Importance of Style 51
  • 6: The Importance of Structure 73
  • 7: Using Illustration 90
  • 8: Moral Authorship Responsibilities and Rights 101
  • 9: Writing for Journals 117
  • 10: The Journal Process 129
  • 11: Newspapers and Other Forms of Publication 143
  • 12: Doing a Book 155
  • 13: From Idea to Reality a Book’s Journey to Print 163
  • 14: Changing Media 187
  • Postscript: Becoming an Academic Author 194
  • Bibliography and References 200
  • Index 203
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