Becoming an Author: Advice for Academics and Other Professionals

By David Canter; Gavin Fairbairn | Go to book overview

8
Moral authorship
Responsibilities and rights
A range of constraints • Using material in more than
one publication • Plagiarism • Joint authorship
Relationships between authors and editors
Contracts and agents • Copyright • Being a morally
responsible author

A range of constraints

Writing is usually carried out in isolation. However, it is part of a social process and it becomes a public event as soon as there is an attempt to get others to read it or to publish it. When this happens, the author is expected to conform to a range of traditions, professional guidelines, regulations and legal constraints. At the heart of all of them are matters of etiquette about, for example, the ways in which well-mannered co-authors will work together. However, some are more properly thought of as ethical matters – from the wrong that one person does to others by plagiarizing their ideas, to the wrong that a publisher can do to an author (and to readers) by publishing a weak text just

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Becoming an Author: Advice for Academics and Other Professionals
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Becoming an Author - Advice for Academics and Other Professionals iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface vii
  • About the Authors xi
  • 1: Publishing Without Perishing 1
  • 2: The Author’s Journey 10
  • 3: Varieties of Publication 23
  • 4: Beyond the Blank Page 34
  • 5: The Importance of Style 51
  • 6: The Importance of Structure 73
  • 7: Using Illustration 90
  • 8: Moral Authorship Responsibilities and Rights 101
  • 9: Writing for Journals 117
  • 10: The Journal Process 129
  • 11: Newspapers and Other Forms of Publication 143
  • 12: Doing a Book 155
  • 13: From Idea to Reality a Book’s Journey to Print 163
  • 14: Changing Media 187
  • Postscript: Becoming an Academic Author 194
  • Bibliography and References 200
  • Index 203
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