The First Fifty Years of the Rhodes Trust and the Rhodes Scholarships, 1903-1953

By Godfrey Elton | Go to book overview

CHAPTER IV
PEACE AND ITS PROBLEMS

AND so the war went on, with these and many other activities which it would be tedious to mention, until peace came at last. But peace hath her problems, as well as her victories, no less renowned than war.

It had always been the intention of the Trustees to make up as soon as possible for the Scholarships which had been suspended by the war, and when VJ Day came and all hostilities were over it was decided to double the number of Scholarships in most constituencies. But there were many new factors to be considered. It takes some little time to start the machinery for competition and selection. The most elaborate machinery is in America, with its forty-eight States and fifty-six Selection Committees, and in that country it proved impossible within the time available to make arrangements for elections for Michaelmas Term, 1946. There were still a number of potential candidates on service who could not expect to be released in time to compete in their own countries. There were the men who had been elected for 1939 and had not been able to take up their Scholarships, besides those who had had to interrupt the Scholarships which they already held at Oxford. All these had to be given the opportunity of beginning or resuming residence. The age limits for candidates had been, for a long time past, nineteen to twentyfive years, but many who might have competed but for the war were now past twenty-five. Of these not a few were married. It was also a question which could not be answered in 1945 how many additional overseas men Oxford could absorb. It was certain that a great influx would follow demobilization and, since Oxford consists almost entirely of residential Colleges, its Lebensraum is limited. In the result it achieved the impossible by nearly doubling its pre-war numbers.

-174-

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The First Fifty Years of the Rhodes Trust and the Rhodes Scholarships, 1903-1953
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Preface v
  • EDITOR''s FOREWORD vii
  • Acknowledgements ix
  • Contents xi
  • Chapter I- THE BEGINNINGS xiii
  • Chapter II- Lord Lothian and the Years of Peace 16
  • Chapter III- World War Again 33
  • Chapter IV- The New Era 44
  • II- THE RHODES SCHOLARS AND OXFORD 1902-31 57
  • Chapter II- First Arrivals 77
  • Chapter III- Settling Down 92
  • Chapter IV- War 103
  • Chapter V- Change 111
  • III- THE RHODES SCHOLARS AND OXFORD 1931-52 127
  • Chapter II- The System at Work 134
  • Chapter III- The Second World War 161
  • Chapter IV- Peace and Its Problems 174
  • IV- THE AMERICAN SCHOLARSHIPS 183
  • Chapter II- Post-War Changes 202
  • V- RECORDS AND STATISTICS 217
  • Appendix TRUSTEES AND OFFICERS OF THE RHODES TRUST 1955 267
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