Child Soldiers: From Violence to Protection

By Michael Wessells | Go to book overview

Index
Abduction, 31, 37–41; connection with terror, 59–60; of girls, 88–90
Aboke school, 41
Advocacy: DDR programs and, 162; prevention of recruitment, 248–257
Afghanistan, 14–15, 38–39, 42, 48; martyring in, 81; gender discrimination in, 87– 88, 228–229; exploitation of boys, 97; health in, 107–108; land mines in, 114– 115; infeasibility of disarmament in, 157; DDR program in, 171–173; community reintegration in, 228–231; National Children’s Forum, 247–248
Aggression, problems in former child soldiers, 184,192–193
Albanian Youth Council, 246
Alienation, 241–244
Amnesty: for former child soldiers, 219–221; for child recruiters, 239
Angola, 11–12; recruitment by Angolan army, 40; invisibility of girl soldiers, 85; health in, 109–110, 111;and land mines, 115–116; orphanages in, 119–120; psychosocial impact of war on children in, 131–132; cultural beliefs and practices, 147–153; DDR in, 161–164
Annan, Kofi, 236
Armed conflict: impact on children, 18–28; link with poverty, 55; civilian casualties, 108; girls’ reintegration in, 175–177; community reintegration programs in, 186– 189, 251
Assassinations, 103–104
Assault on civilians, 19–20, 24–25; forced killings, 59; forced labor, 78; food insecurity and, 111–112
Attachment to caregivers, 119–120
Becker, Jo, 235
Blood diamonds, 239
Bosnia, 22, 86, 139, 197
Burmese Army, 40, 52, 75; punishments, 61, 62; isolation tactics in, 63; exploitation of civilians, 78; training, 67–68; view of child escapees, 173
Burundi, 34, 125
Cambodia, 55
Cape Town principles, 7
Caritas, 203–204
Category fallacy, 137–138
CCF (Christian Children’s Fund), 148–152, 163, 170, 175–176, 186–189, 195–199, 210–217, 222, 228–231, 244–245, 251
Child combatants: fear reactions in, 74–75; adaptation to killing, 75–76; drinking blood, 75; psychology of learning to kill, 79–81; use of combat names, 83–84. See also Suicide bombers; Terrorism
Child development, 45–46
ChildFund Afghanistan, 228–231, 245
Child-headed households, 118–120
Child labor, 6, 15, 25, 35, 36, 41, 71, 87, 97, 108, 117, 119, 120, 130, 142, 166, 167, 234
Child participation, 180; as core principle, 228; in reintegration and protection programs, 228–231
Child protection: perceived protection via magic and spiritual practices, 71, 102– 103; through association with a “husband,” 95–96; through pregnancy, 96; and DDR, 154, 178–179; in group living situations, 185; definition of, 224–225; community mechanisms of, 226–228, 229–

-277-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Note: primary sources have slightly different requirements for citation. Please see these guidelines for more information.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Child Soldiers: From Violence to Protection
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Child Soldiers - From Violence to Protection iii
  • Contents vii
  • Preface ix
  • Acknowledgments xiii
  • Abbreviations xv
  • 1: Child Victims, Young Combatants 1
  • 2: Entry into Armed Groups 31
  • 3: Inside Armed Groups 57
  • 4: Girl Soldiers 85
  • 5: Health and HIV/AIDS 107
  • 6: The Invisible Wounds of War 126
  • 7: Putting Down the Gun 154
  • 8: The Transition to Civilian Life 181
  • 9: Community Reconciliation, Justice, and Protection 208
  • 10: Prevention 232
  • Reference Index 259
  • References 261
  • Index 277
Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
Items saved from this book
  • Bookmarks
  • Highlights & Notes
  • Citations
/ 285

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA 8, MLA 7, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Search by... Author
    Show... All Results Primary Sources Peer-reviewed

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.