Gangrene and Glory: Medical Care during the American Civil War

By Frank R. Freemon | Go to book overview

Abbreviations

Abbreviations used in the tables and notes:

MSHThe Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion was published by the Surgeon General's office, U.S. Army, from 1875 to 1885. The first three volumes, called the Medical Volume, were written by J. J. Woodward and Charles Smart. The last three, called the Surgical Volume, were written by George A. Otis and D. L. Huntington. This work has been reproduced with a full index by Broadfoot Publishing, Wilmington N.C., under the title The Medical and Surgical History of the Civil War.
ORThe War of the Rebellion: A Compilation of the Official Records of the Union and Con federate Armies was published by the U.S. War Department beginning in 1888. This collection of reports and orders, gathered under the direction of Robert N. Scott and Henry M. Lazelle, officially fills 128 volumes in four series. Many of the volumes are broken into two or more parts so that the actual number of books approaches 200. If not otherwise indicated, the volume quoted is from the first series.
ORNThe Official Records of the Union and Con federate Navies in the War of the Rebellion was published by the U.S. Navy Department from 1894 to 1922. These naval reports and orders were compiled in thirty volumes by Richard Ruth and Robert H. Woods.

Identification of regiments: During the Civil War, the dominant military organizational element was the regiment. Each regiment is referred to by number and state. Cavalry and artillery are specified; if no type of arm is indicated, the regiment is infantry. For example, the 6th Indiana is the 6th Indiana Infantry Regiment, U.S. Volunteers. The 4th United States is the 4th Infantry Regiment, U.S. Army (called the regular army). If the same state had regiments fight for both sides, then the side is in parentheses. The 1st South Carolina (Union) was formed of former slaves; in February 1864 it was redesignated the 33rd regiment, U.S.C.T. (U.S. Colored Troops).

SOURCE ABBREVIATIONS FOR ILLUSTRATIONS:

Holland:Mary A. Holland, Our Army Nurses, Boston: B. Wilkins and Co., 1897.
HW:Harper's Weekly.
Miller:Francis Miller, Photographic His tory of the Civil War, New York: Review of Books, 1911.
MSH:Medical and Surgical History of the War of the Rebellion.
NA:National Archives, Washington, DC
NLM:National Library of Medicine, Washington, DC
USAMHI:U.S. Army Military History Institute, Carlisle, PA

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