Toussaint's Clause: The Founding Fathers and the Haitian Revolution

By Gordon S. Brown | Go to book overview

EMBARGO AND NEGLECT

When the congressional session adjourned at the beginning of March 1806, President Jefferson could be satisfied with the foreign policy results he had achieved. To manage the crisis with Britain, he had been given some promising tools to work with. The Congress had passed a Non-Importation Act, which barred the import from Britain of a variety of manufactured products for which there were American or other substitutes. The objective was to hurt the British economy in retaliation for the damage to American shipping, perhaps gaining some negotiating leverage in the process while promoting domestic manufacturing. The British West Indian trade was not touched.

But in spite of a steady public uproar over the continued British seizures and impressments, there appeared to be no consensus on actually putting into effect the trade restrictions that Congress had just passed. There did seem to be general agreement, on the other hand, that the grievances against Britain just might be resolved by negotiation. Consequently, the administration had asked for, and Congress approved, a negotiating mandate. The president, temporarily waiving the terms of the Non-Importation Act, selected William Pinckney to assist James Monroe, the American minister in London, to conduct the negotiation.

To deal with Spain over the Florida issue, Jefferson had also gotten the mandate he wanted. Congress had approved negotiations to

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Toussaint's Clause: The Founding Fathers and the Haitian Revolution
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Foreword vii
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction 3
  • July 1790 8
  • St. Domingue 23
  • White Cockade, Red Cockade 45
  • The Cost of Neutrality 66
  • Trouble with Britain 89
  • Trouble with France 106
  • Toussaint's Clause 126
  • Creating a Quarantine 144
  • The St. Domingo Station 162
  • Jefferson Equivocates 179
  • The Leclerc Expedition 199
  • St. Domingo and Louisiana 213
  • A Risky Trade 229
  • The Clearance Act Debate 245
  • The Trade Suspended 263
  • Embargo and Neglect 279
  • Epilogue 292
  • Notes 296
  • Bibliography 310
  • Index 317
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