Old Testament Theology: Basic Issues in the Current Debate

By Gerhard F. Hasel | Go to book overview

VI. Basic Proposals
for Doing OT Theology

Our attempt to focus on unresolved crucial problems which are at the center of the current crisis in OT theology has revealed that there are basic inadequacies in the current methodologies and approaches. The inevitable question that has arisen is, Where do we go from here? Our strictures with regard to the paths trodden by Biblical theologians have indicated that a basically new approach must be worked out. A productive way to proceed from here on appears to have to rest upon the following basic proposals for doing OT theology.

(1) Biblical theology must be understood to be a historicaltheological discipline. This is to say that the Biblical theologian engaged in doing either Old or New Testament theology must claim as his task both to discover and describe what the text meant and also to explicate what it means for today. The Biblical theologian attempts to “get back there,”1 i.e., he wants to do away with the temporal gap by bridging the time span between his day and that of the Biblical witnesses, by means of the historical study of the Biblical documents. The nature of the Biblical documents, however, inasmuch as they are themselves witnesses of the eternal purpose of God for Israel and for the world as manifested through divine acts and words

1. This phrase comes from G. E. Wright, “The Theological Study of the
Bible,” The Interpreter's One-Volume Commentary on the Bible (Nashville,
1971), p. 983.

-194-

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Old Testament Theology: Basic Issues in the Current Debate
Table of contents

Table of contents

  • Title Page iii
  • Contents v
  • Preface ix
  • Introduction 1
  • I. Beginnings and Development of Ot Theology 10
  • Ii. the Question of Methodology 28
  • Iii. the Question of History, History of Tradition, Salvation History, and Story 115
  • Iv. the Center of the Ot and Ot Theology 139
  • V: The Relationship between the Testaments 172
  • Vi. Basic Proposals for Doing Ot Theology 194
  • Selected Bibliography 209
  • Index of Subjects 252
  • Index of Authors 258
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