Black Soldiers in Blue: African American Troops in the Civil War Era

By John David Smith | Go to book overview

8
THE USCT IN THE
CONFEDERATE HEARTLAND, 1864

Anne J. Bailey

Emancipation struck a deathblow to bondage, but newly freed slaves found liberation offered few tangible rewards in the occupied South. Even before the Union government made emancipation the official policy, many Northerners argued that Washington bureaucrats had to demonstrate a true commitment to change. One way to fulfill that obligation and at the same time guarantee the promise of legal freedom was to allow African Americans to join the army. But until Lincoln issued his Emancipation Proclamation, Northern legislators had not embraced the idea of blacks in Union blue with enthusiasm. Although black Northerners and white abolitionists had long argued the benefits of enlisting African Americans, the majority of Northern citizens felt uncomfortable with what an armed black man would mean to society at large. Even after the War Department sanctioned black enlistments, there were Union-occupied regions in the South that lagged behind. In the Confederate heartland of Tennessee the administration had to balance the loyalty of law-abiding slaveholders against the army's need for more manpower. Not everyone agreed with Lincoln's policy, and some generals refused to include black regiments in white combat armies, preferring instead to use African American enlistees for garrison duty, as laborers and railroad guards, or in other menial positions. They balked at using blacks in meaningful roles that would allow them to fight alongside white soldiers. Major General William Tecumseh Sherman was one of those commanders who simply refused to consider using blacks in combat.1

Moreover, it was impossible to ignore Sherman's defiance, for as 1864 opened he commanded the vast Western Theater. He had assumed this posi-

-227-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Black Soldiers in Blue: African American Troops in the Civil War Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 451

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.