Black Soldiers in Blue: African American Troops in the Civil War Era

By John David Smith | Go to book overview

14
USCT VETERANS
IN POST-CIVIL WAR
NORTH CAROLINA

Richard Reid

On the morning of February 22, 1865, Union troops under the command of General Alfred H. Terry marched into the smoke-shrouded city of Wilmington, North Carolina, hard on the heels of General Braxton Bragg's retreating Confederates. Among the many soldiers filing through the city that day were the men of General Charles Paine's all-black division, including the 37th U.S. Colored Troops (USCT), a regiment raised in North Carolina. One of the men, recognized and embraced by his mother, was described in a fellow soldier's letter in a way that would have resonated with many black enlisted men. “He had left his home a slave,” the letter's author, who was in the 4th USCT, wrote, “but he returned in the garb of a union soldier, free, a man.”1 Both mother and son would have been aware of the new aspirations and expectations of equal treatment that were formed as part of the black military experience. The black veterans had been changed in diverse ways. Many had achieved a degree of literacy, while black noncommissioned officers had developed leadership abilities and learned to handle a range of newresponsibilities. All the soldiers had their personal worlds broadened as they tramped through parts of the nation that they had never seen. Most would have agreed with Frederick Douglass that when a black man could “get an eagle on his button, and a musket on his shoulder, and bullets in his pocket,” then no one could deny that he had earned the rights of citizenship.2

“Yet if black veterans looked forward eagerly to new changes as a result of their military service, it was equally clear that much of Southern white society clung to the values and attitudes of the past. One of the black sol-

-391-

Notes for this page

Add a new note
If you are trying to select text to create highlights or citations, remember that you must now click or tap on the first word, and then click or tap on the last word.
One moment ...
Default project is now your active project.
Project items

Items saved from this book

This book has been saved
Highlights (0)
Some of your highlights are legacy items.

Highlights saved before July 30, 2012 will not be displayed on their respective source pages.

You can easily re-create the highlights by opening the book page or article, selecting the text, and clicking “Highlight.”

Citations (0)
Some of your citations are legacy items.

Any citation created before July 30, 2012 will labeled as a “Cited page.” New citations will be saved as cited passages, pages or articles.

We also added the ability to view new citations from your projects or the book or article where you created them.

Notes (0)
Bookmarks (0)

You have no saved items from this book

Project items include:
  • Saved book/article
  • Highlights
  • Quotes/citations
  • Notes
  • Bookmarks
Notes
Cite this page

Cited page

Style
Citations are available only to our active members.
Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

(Einhorn, 1992, p. 25)

(Einhorn 25)

1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

Cited page

Bookmark this page
Black Soldiers in Blue: African American Troops in the Civil War Era
Table of contents

Table of contents

Settings

Settings

Typeface
Text size Smaller Larger Reset View mode
Search within

Search within this book

Look up

Look up a word

  • Dictionary
  • Thesaurus
Please submit a word or phrase above.
Print this page

Print this page

Why can't I print more than one page at a time?

Help
Full screen
/ 451

matching results for page

    Questia reader help

    How to highlight and cite specific passages

    1. Click or tap the first word you want to select.
    2. Click or tap the last word you want to select, and you’ll see everything in between get selected.
    3. You’ll then get a menu of options like creating a highlight or a citation from that passage of text.

    OK, got it!

    Cited passage

    Style
    Citations are available only to our active members.
    Buy instant access to cite pages or passages in MLA, APA and Chicago citation styles.

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn, 1992, p. 25).

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences." (Einhorn 25)

    "Portraying himself as an honest, ordinary person helped Lincoln identify with his audiences."1

    1. Lois J. Einhorn, Abraham Lincoln, the Orator: Penetrating the Lincoln Legend (Westport, CT: Greenwood Press, 1992), 25, http://www.questia.com/read/27419298.

    Cited passage

    Thanks for trying Questia!

    Please continue trying out our research tools, but please note, full functionality is available only to our active members.

    Your work will be lost once you leave this Web page.

    Buy instant access to save your work.

    Already a member? Log in now.

    Oops!

    An unknown error has occurred. Please click the button below to reload the page. If the problem persists, please try again in a little while.